UNDERGRADUATE COURSE DESCRIPTION

Fall Semester


Classical Studies - Ancient Greek Philology and Literature

僚种 010 - Greek Reading and Prose Class: Part I
Instructor:Athina Kavoulaki, Nikos Litinas, Anastasios Nikolaidis
Description:The course is intended primarily for first year undergraduates and presupposes (at least) intermediate knowledge of ancient Greek. It aims a) at extending the students' knowledge of the morphology and syntax of the Ancient Greek language (Attic dialect), b) at improving their reading skills, and c) at developing their skill in Greek prose composition. Every three-hour teaching session will include a. the reading and translation of an excerpt from a Greek prose text (of the fifth or fourth century BC. mainly), together with analytical discussion of important grammatical and syntactical features; b. the theoretical presentation of and Exercises in an important syntactical topic; c. an Exercise in Greek prose writing with features of the syntactical structure in discussion. The detailed theoretical analysis refers mainly to the syntax of the simple sentence. The topics to be covered are: a. the use of cases, and in particular genitive, dative and accusative; b. the use of moods in independent sentences; c. the use of tenses (of and outside of the indicative); d. the infinitive; e. the participle. Throughout the course particular emphasis will be also placed upon issues of accentuation, vowel and consonant change and declension of nouns and verbs. Handouts with the appropriate theoretical material and Exercises will be distributed at every meeting. A basic bibliography will be also available at the beginning of the course.
Type:Exercise
Assessment:Written examination

僚种 060 - Transcription of Greek papyri (310 B.C. - 285 A.D.)
Instructor: Sophie Kambitsis
Description: Commentary especially as concerns the form and the language of the documents.
Type: Exercise
Assessment: Written examination

僚种 100 - Introduction to Classical Philology
Instructor: Odysseus Tsagarakis
Description: The methods, aims and general concepts of philology are first discussed. There follows a review from the beginnings to the 19. century with particular emphasis on developments and on the contribution great scholars made to preserving ancient literature and keeping it alive. Specific topics of discussion include: a) manuscripts (location, study, writing material and instruments), b) philological and literary approach to the texts, prosody, orthoepeia, apparatus criticus etc.), c) literary genres, main characteristics, development etc., d) scholarly research, methods, the "Homeric Question", e) classical metres, scansion, f) Greek and Latin paleography, g) dialects, the most important characteristics, historical development, h) philological and literary translation, i) getting acquainted with the tools of research, periodicals, scholarly series, editions etc.
Type: Lecture
Assessment: Written examination

僚种 102 - Homer's Odyssey
Instructor: Odysseus Tsagarakis
Description: Introduction to heroic epic and the Homeric epics, tradition and innovation, composition of the epics, oral poetry, language, metre, influences, with particular emphasis on the Odyssey. Readings, especially of the Eleventh Book, discussion of the problems of certain passages, such as the "catalogue of famous women", "intermezzo", etc., questions of authenticity, the place of the Book in the poem, sources and influences, concepts of psyche and ideas about life after death. Commentary, scansion, translation.
Type: Lecture
Assessment: Written examination

僚种 120 - Melic and Choral Poetry
Instructor: Anastasia-Erasmia Peponi
Description: We will examine the difficulties in defining lyric as a poetic genre in antiquity and modern times. Key themes in the course will include: relationships, similarities and contrasts among the distinctive kinds of archaic lyric (iambic, elegiae and melic); the role of musical accompaniment and dance in the performance of melic poetry; and the limits of the distinction between choral and monodic. Close readings of chosen melic compositions organised by theme, comparing fragments of the poets Alcman, Stesichorus, Alcaeus, Sappho, Anacreon, Ibycus, Simonides and Pindar will focus on two issues: similarities and differences in the contruction of mythopoetic structure, mise en scene, imager, diction and rhythm; and elements that directly of indirectly refer to the circumstances and modes of performance.
Type: Lecture
Assessment: Written examination

僚种 262 - Gorgias Helen
Instructor: Joanna Yatromanolaki
Description: An introductory course to Sophistic Rhetoric based on the reading of Gorgias' Helen. Apart from the close reading and commentary of the text, the course will include an introduction to the historical development of this type of rhetoric with emphasis on Gorgias' contribution in formulating a theory of style and content for prose at the transitional stage from the poetic use of language.
Type: Lecture
Assessment: Written examination

僚种 273 - Xenophon, Expeditio Cyri
Instructor: Christos Tsagalis
Description: The aim of this course is to familiarize students with the last and less known member of the famous, albeit uneven, historiographical trio (Herodotus, Thucydides, Xenophon) through the study of a work which will at once take its readers by storm. The Expedition of Cyrus has all the necessary ingredients to attract the reader's attention: wandering through a foreign and hostile land, fighting and suspense, persistence and cooperation until the final salvation. The work is particularly interesting in the way it illuminates binary and bipolar relations between Greeks and barbarians, men and women, citizens vs. non-citizens, free-men and slaves, humans and gods. The final exam will consist of three parts: a) passages for translation accompanied by questions on grammar and syntax b) passages for interpretation and analysis and c) questions concerning Xenophon and Greek Historiography in general.
Type: Lecture
Assessment: Written examination

僚种 298 - Euripides' Heracles and Seneca's Herculens Furens
Instructor: Michael Paschalis
Description: The course involves an intertextual reading of Euripides' Heracles and Seneca's Hercules Furens which dramatize Hercules' clash with Lycus and the hero's subsequent madness. Particular attention will be given to issues of dramatic structure technique.
Type: Lecture
Assessment: Written examination

僚种 305 - Thetis, Andromache, Helen, Hecabe: The Female and its Function in the Iliad
Instructor: Christos Tsagalis
Description: The Iliad is mainly concerned with the presentation of the klea andron. In such an epic framework what is the place and function of the female? How is the role of the important female figures of the epic (such as Thetis, Andromache, Helen, Hecabe and even Briseis) related with the plot and the main male characters each one of them is associated with? Are women simple reflections of male prototypes in respect of character drawing or do they have their own "poetic" life and contrast male power with human weakness, kleos with achos and penthos, the battlefield with the oikos and finally war with homilia? The course will be assessed by: a) oral presentations on specific topics which will be delivered by the students during the Seminar and b) a written term paper.
Type: Seminar
Assessment: Written term paper and oral presentation

僚种 316 - Ideology and Aesthetics in the poetry of Simonides
Instructor: Anastasia-Erasmia Peponi
Description: We will read the surviving fragments of Simonides as well as the sources referring to this poet along two axes. First, we shall investigate the various ways in which Simonidean poetry reflects on the existence and contruction of a communal value-system relaring to identity of the polls. Second, we shall examine the way in which Simonidean poetry contemplates issues related to an overarching theory of art.
Type: Seminar
Assessment: Written term paper

僚种 324 - Ritual and Theatre
Instructor: Athina Kavoulaki
Description: This course has the format of a Seminar and can be attended by not more than twenty five third and fourth year students. The general aim is to teach students major research techniques as well as oral and written argumentation and presentation. Every student will have to prepare a paper which he/she must present orally and in a written form. The topics of the assignments will fall within the larger area of the title of the Seminar, i.e. ancient Greek drama (particularly tragedy) and ritual analysis. The particular object of study will be to explore the ways in which ritual forms, patterns and sequences are remoulded into the imagery and action of classical Greek plays. The first session(s) will be introductory: the theme of the Seminar (the concepts of myth and ritual; trends of analysis; the question of ritual and drama); the scope and method of the Seminar; research assignments. The other sessions will be structured in a twofold way: a. as a reading group, aiming at intensive and co-operative discussion of texts and theoretical views; and b. around a paper followed by discussion. Three major categories of rituals will be discussed (sacrificial rituals; initiatory rituals; death rituals) and their manifestations in Greek tragedies. The last session will be dedicated to conclusions and to the discussion of an example of ritual representation in Aristophanic comedy.
Type: Seminar
Assessment: Written term paper

僚种 331 - Herodotus' inquiry and its presentation.
Instructor: Yannis Tzifopoulos
Description: Extensive readings from Herodotus' Histories with emphasis on his historiographical method and the presentation of his inquiries.
Type: Seminar
Assessment: Written term paper

僚种 340 - Comparisons of Bioi in Plutarch's Lives
Instructor: Anastasios Nikolaidis
Description: The Seminar will focus on a close examination of the compositional techniques in Plutarch's Comparisons concluding most pairs of his Parallel Lives. More specifically, it will be investigated to what extent these Comparisons comply with the rules of Synkrisis found in rhetorical manuals, and to what extent they are governed by Plutarch's own manipulation of the biographical material.
Type: Seminar
Assessment: Written term paper


Classical Studies - Latin Philology and Literature

肆种 010 - Elementary Latin
Instructor: Yannis Tzifopoulos, Lucia Athanassaki
Description: Use of the cases, infinitive, participle, supine, gerund and gerundive; tenses, moods, consecutio temporum. Latin prose composition.
Type: Exercise
Assessment: Written examination

僚种 298 - Euripides' Heracles and Seneca's Herculens Furens
Instructor: Michael Paschalis
Description: The course involves an intertextual reading of Euripides' Heracles and Seneca's Hercules Furens which dramatize Hercules' clash with Lycus and the hero's subsequent madness. Particular attention will be given to issues of dramatic structure technique.
Type: Lecture
Assessment: Written examination

肆种 325 - Scenic and Dramatic Space in Greek Tragedy and in Seneca's dramas
Instructor: Michael Paschalis
Description: The Seminar will focus on similarities and differences in the function of space in Greek (especially Euripidean) and Senecan theatre. The areas of investigation will include the relation of the visible scenic space to those sections of dramatic space which are left to the reader's imagination, the interior and the off-stage area. Assignments: reading and discussion of Greek and Latin texts, reports on books and articles, writing and presentation of a Seminar paper.
Type: Seminar
Assessment: Written term paper

肆种 363 - The Reception of Archaic Poetry by the First and Second Generation of the Roman Neoterics
Instructor: Lucia Athanassaki
Description: The purpose of this Seminar is to examine the variety of influences which Callimachean poetics Exercises on the way the Roman neoterics read, evaluate, and assimilate Archaic Greek poetry as well as the nature and the extent of their divergence from Callimachean principles, which results in a new approach characterized by a definitely Roman sensibility.
Type: Seminar
Assessment: Written term paper


Byzantine and Modern Greek Philology - Byzantine Philology

抡种 100 - Introduction to Byzantine literature
Instructor: Marina Loukaki
Description: The lecture course is intended for first-year students and includes: a short history of Byzantine studies; basic handbooks, dictionaries and journals; an account of the literary genres which were cultivated in Byzantium; reading of and commentary on selected extracts.
Type: Lecture
Assessment: Written examination

抡种 250 - George of Pisidia, Encomiastic epic poetry
Instructor: Ioannis Vassis
Description: The early Byzantine encomiastic epic poetry: tradition and innovation. Historical poems by George of Pisidia concerning the expeditions of the emperor Heraclius against the Persians and the siege of Constantinople by the Avars (first half of the seventh century): Expeditio persica, Bellum avaricum, Heraclias.
Type: Lecture
Assessment: Written examination

抡种 295 - The First Byzantine Humanism
Instructor: Athanasios Markopoulos
Description: Introduction. "Humanism" in the Byzantine era. Hellenism and Christianity. Education in Early Byzantium. The so-called "Dark Age" and contemporary perceptions. Iconoclasm and the Studites. Minuscule writing. Photius' Bibliotheca and Lexicon. Macedonian Dynasty. Arethas' collection of manuscripts. Return to Antiquity. Schools in Constantinople in the 10th century. The encyclopaedic writings attributed to Constantine Porphyrogenitus. Conclusions.
Type: Lecture
Assessment: Written examination

抡种 341 - Byzantine Poetics: Theory and praxis
Instructor: Ioannis Vassis
Description: The ancient poetic forms in Byzantium: tradition and innovation. Poetry and rhetoric: the concept of imitation and originality, the communicative function of poetry and its integration into ritual and everyday life. Topics and topoi: the image of the other, the perception of travel as a literary device, customs and beliefs as reflected in occasional poetry. From theory to practice: aesthetic theory and literary criticism.
Type: Seminar
Assessment: Written term paper and oral presentation

抡种 365 - Leo the Philosopher (or Mathematician)
Instructor: Athanasios Markopoulos
Description: An attempt to reconstruct the life of Leo. Students will be required to present papers on Leo's specific activities, especially his role as educationalist and scribe and the emergence of the Arabic connection.
Type: Seminar
Assessment: Written term paper and oral presentation

抡种 391 - Ordinary people in 12th-century literature
Instructor: Marina Loukaki
Description: Numerous and varied changes can be observed in the mentality and society of the Byzantine world during the 12th century. Among other things there is increasing interest in the human being as an individual and in everyday life. The aim of the Seminar is to examine which aspects of personal and everyday life enter the literature of the period and appear repeatedly as writers' favourite themes.
Type: Seminar
Assessment: Written term paper and oral presentation


Byzantine and Modern Greek Philology - Modern Greek Philology and Literature

团种 124 - Early Cretan literature
Instructor: Stefanos Kaklamanis
Description: An account will be given of the main characteristics of literary production in Crete from the mid-14th to the end of the 15th century, with detailed study of extracts from the poetical works of Stefanos Sachlikis, Leonardos Dellaportas, Bergadis, Marinos Falieros, Neilos Bertos, Andreas Sklentzas and Georgios Choumnos.
Type: Lecture
Assessment: Written examination

团种 157 - 1821-1831: Modern Greek Poetry in a Revolutionary period
Instructor: Alexis Politis
Description: The aim of the course is to trace the revolutionary changes which occurred in Modern Greek poetry during the War of Independence - changes in its ideological orientation, its forms, and in the concept of poetry itself - and to examine its impact on European philhellenic circles. There will be discussion of the most representative poets (Solomos, Kalvos) and of general trends in Greek poetry. Finally it will be observed that with the creation of the independent state all new paths were suddenly closed apart from that of passive Romanticism. The course will be based on the discussion of texts which will be distributed in photocopies.
Type: Lecture
Assessment: Written examination

团种 204 - The poetry of Palamas and Sikelianos, 1897-1918
Instructor: Stamatis Philippides
Description: There are similarities and differences in the poetic rhetoric of Palamas and Sikelianos. By examining the form, the meaning and the ideological background of Palamas' Immobile life and The twelve lays of the gypsy, and Sikelianos' The visionary and Four consciousnesses, this course attempts to locate these Modern Greek poems within the neo- and the post-romantic European movements of Symbolism, Aestheticism and decadence. Besides the poems by Palamas and Sikelianos other texts will be studied in translation, mainly works by Hugo, Nietzsche, Amiel, and D'Annunzio. One final written examination.
Type: Lecture
Assessment: Written examination

团种 208 - K. Varnalis - K. G. Karyotakis
Instructor: Christina Dounia
Description: Two different poetical personalities, Kostas Varnalis (1884-1974) and K. G. Karyotakis (1896-1928) cross paths under the shadow of the crisis in values created in Greece after the failure of the Great Idea (1922). Both Varnalis, with his Parnassian roots and Marxist ideology, and Karyotakis, with his debts to Neo-symbolism and the "po閠es maudits", restate in a personal way the problems of the relation of the poet to society and of the meaning of art itself.
Type: Lecture
Assessment: Written examination

团种 219 - Literature in the troubled decade 1940-1950
Instructor: Angela Kastrinaki
Description: World War II, Occupation, Civil war: how do writers react in conditions of extreme disruption? After the engagement of artists during the mobilisaton of 1940-1, there follows a tendency during the Occupation to seek escape in ideal worlds, far from the grim reality. At the end of the Occupation, a demand is expressed for an epic art, which is actually produced only after the end of the war. The civil war will naturally propel art into a new phase of engagement.
Type: Lecture
Assessment: Written examination

团种 257 - Contemporary trends in modern Greek literature (1974-1990): poetry and prose
Instructor: Evripidis Garantoudis
Description: The course will aim to locate the main tendencies characteristic of literature, both poetry and prose, in the period from 1974 to 1990. It will examine the literary work of younger poets and prose writers who emerged on the literary scene during the 1970s. The upper limit for works to be examined has been placed at 1990 so as to ensure a minimal safe distance from the texts. The course will study works of the poets Nasos Vagenas, Michalis Ganas, Yannis Kontos, Jenny Mastoraki, Lefteris Poulios and Manolis Pratikakis, and of the prose-writers Rea Galanaki, Giorgis Giatromanolakis, Maro Douka, Dimitris Dimitriadis, Alexis Panselinos and Nikos Houliaras.
Type: Lecture
Assessment: Written examination

团种 283 - Byron and the Greeks
Instructor: Litsa Hatzpoulou
Description: Part A: An introduction to Byron's poetry with a more systematic study of the poems which influenced the work of Greek Romantics (The curse of Minerva, Childe Harold's pilgrimage, The Giaour, The bride of Abydos, Don Juan ). Part B: An examination of Byron's influence on Greek Romantic poetry (1830-1880). A comparative study of the assimilation and elaboration of Byronic motifs by Athenian and Heptanesian Romanticism. Analytical study of selected works of the period (Alexander and Panagiotis Soutsos, A. R. Rangavis, Dionysios Solomos, A. Valaoritis, D. N. Vernardakis, Emmanuel Roidis). N. B.: If the area "Comparative Literature - Literary Theory" is already covered, the course could be given a code number from the area "1669-1850" or "1850-1930".
Type: Lecture
Assessment: Written examination

团种 314 - Greek metrics in the 19th century
Instructor: Evripidis Garantoudis
Description: The aim of the Seminar is to familiarise students with research in the metrics of formal versification. There will be instruction on the basic rules which regulate the morphology of verse texts (metre, rhythm, line, accentual system, vowel juxtapositions, rhyme, enjambement etc.). The topics of Seminar papers will relate to specific poetical texts of important 19th century Greek poets, such as Solomos, Palamas, Valaoritis and Markoras. The knowledge of general morphological rules will be applied to the specific poetical texts, with the aid of the relevant bibliography on aspects of metre.
Type: Seminar
Assessment: Written term paper and oral presentation

团种 332 - Vitsentzos Kornaros' reading of Antonios Achelis
Instructor: Stefanos Kaklamanis
Description: An examination of the intertextual relations between Achelis' Siege of Malta (1571) and Kornaros' Erotokritos (early 17th century): themes, topoi, motifs, modes of expression, narrative technique, versification etc.
Type: Seminar
Assessment: Written term paper and oral presentation

团种 341 - Literary revision in the work of the first post-war generation
Instructor: Angela Kastrinaki
Description: A comparison between the successive editions of narratives by writers of the first post-war generation with the aim of discovering changes in their aesthetic and ideological positions.
Type: Seminar
Assessment: Written term paper and oral presentation

团种 349 - Trends in the post-war short story (1944-1967)
Instructor: Christina Dounia
Description: Narrative techniques and thematics in the short story in the post-war period. The realist tradition; internal focalisation or autobiographical discourse; aspects of new social structures and relations as reflected in the works of S. Tsirkas, D. Chatzis, A. Samarakis, M. Koumandareas, G. Ioannou, V. Vassilikos and other less well-kown writers who published their work between 1944 and 1967.
Type: Seminar
Assessment: Written term paper and oral presentation

团种 369 - The Poetry of Takis Papatsonis
Instructor: Stamatis Philippides
Description: The poetry of Papatsonis presents two major interpretative problems: a) its unusual position in between the established Modern Greek poetic traditions of his time (such as those formed by Sikelianos and/or Cavafy) and Modern Greek modernism (Seferis, Elytis), and b) the contradictory articulation of his poetic space between paganism and Christian religiosity. Each student will make an oral presentation and, at the end of the course, submit a Seminar paper: a) dealing with the problematic set out by the professor at the first meetings of the class, and b) applying this problematic to specific poems by Papatsonis.
Type: Seminar
Assessment: Written term paper and oral presentation

团种 372 - The problem of evil in literature
Instructor: Litsa Hatzpoulou
Description: A study of representative works from world literature in which the problem of evil is addressed either directly or indirectly in connection with certain types of theological speculation (Voltaire, Blake, Goethe, Byron, Baudelaire, Tolstoy, Dostoyevsky, Papadiamantis, Kazantzakis, Camus, Williams et al.)
Type: Seminar
Assessment: Written term paper and oral presentation


Linguistics

盟僦 100 - Introduction to theoretical linguistics
Instructor: Alexis Kalokairinos
Description: This course is designed as a general introduction to the field of modern linguistics. During the first lectures, which deal with the nature of human language, an effort is made to get rid of common misconceptions about language. Students are then offered a brief guided tour of the main subfields of linguistics: phonetics and phonology, morphology, syntax (with emphasis on generative grammar), semantics and pragmatics.
Type: Lecture
Assessment: Written examination

盟僦 102 - Introduction to the history of Greek language
Instructor: Evangelia Thomadaki
Description: The course surveys the main stages through which Greek has evolved as a member of the Indoeuropean family. The characteristic changes on every level of linguistic structure (phonology, morphology, syntax and vocabulary), marking transition from one stage to the next in the history of Greek, as well as those features signalling dialect diversification, will be presented and explained, proceded by a brief account of principles of comparative - historical methodology
Type: Lecture
Assessment: Written examination

盟僦 109 - Language Typology
Instructor: Elena Anagnostopoulou
Description: An introductory level course on language typology organized in three parts: (i) general issues, (ii) theoretical frameworks, (iii) approaches to specific problems. In the first part, the students are introduced to the notions of Language Universals and Language-specific properties. A number of phenomena from a variety of genetically unrelated languages are presented to show that there are properties all languages have in common, and there are systematic constraints on cross-linguistic variation. The second part introduces the students to the main fields of typological research, from the Prague School to the Generative Grammar tradition. The objective of this part is to help students understand the diversity of theoretical orientations and practical methodologies underlying the research on typology. The third part compares the various approaches by presenting specific linguistic problems and outlining how these have been dealt with in the frameworks in question.
Type: Lecture
Assessment: Written examination

盟僦 175 - Grammar of Modern Greek
Instructor: Georgia Catsimali
Description: The course explores the notion of "grammar" vs. grammatical theory, the use of "reference grammar" vs. pedagogical grammar and the different perspectives of grammatical analysis (descriptive, prescriptive, explanatory etc.). By comparing different published books of Modern Greek grammar (Triandafyllides, Mackridge, Clairis-Babiniotis, Holton-MackridgePhilippaki), we dwell in main characteristics of Modern Greek in terms of phonology, morphology, syntax and semantics.
Type: Lecture
Assessment: Written examination

盟僦 202 - Phonological Development
Instructor: Ioanna Kappa
Description: This course provides an introduction to the problem of language acquisition from the phonological point of view, investigating aspects of the infant speech perception and vocal production through the acquisition of phonology. A range of theoret遚al models and approaches will be presented and discussed and four aspects of phonological development will be central to our account: the interaction of perception and production, the prosodic and segmental approaches, the cross-linguistic perspectives and the signifiance of individual differences.
Type: Lecture
Assessment: Written examination

盟僦 280 - Issues of methodology in theoretical linguistics: Data, Description and Analysis
Instructor: Elena Anagnostopoulou
Description: An introduction to methods and techniques used in theoretical linguistics. Data retrieval, assessment of the reliability of linguistic judgments by intuition, working with corpus data. Mathematical methods which find linguistic applications: sets, relations, trees, formal grammars. Formal properties of different models of grammar: Transformational Grammar, Categorial Grammar, Relational Grammar, Head-Driven Phrase Structure Grammar.
Type: Lecture
Assessment: Written examination

盟僦 310 - Topics in phonological analysis within the optimality theory framework
Instructor: Ioanna Kappa
Description: This course will be run as a weekly Seminar with a focus on reading, presentation and discussion of the recent developed theoretical framework of Optimality Theory (OT). The main concepts of the theory will be discussed and the way in which OT accounts for the central issues in linguistics: the universals, variation and markedness. A tentative list of topics and readings (covering different areas of phonology, such as features, syllable structure, stress etc.) will be given, and will be supplemented according to the interests of the class. Students will be expected to lead discussion of a few papers during the course, and be prepared to discuss the other papers.
Type: Seminar
Assessment: Written term paper and oral presentation

盟僦 328 - Topics in MGR vocabulary research and teaching
Instructor: Evangelia Thomadaki
Description: The Seminar aims at a detailed approach of issues concerning the organisation, development, expansion and evolution of lexical structure of MGR, in the light of recent linguistic research in the field. The consequences of theoretical analysis for reaching purposes are also examined and assessed.
Type: Seminar
Assessment: Written term paper and oral presentation


Theater-Cinema Studies and Musicology

刃林 100 - A Review of the History of European Theatre. A': From the Middle Ages up to the Age of Enlightenment
Instructor: Antonis Glytzouris
Description: This course offers to the students a general introduction to the history of European theatre. It presents an outline of Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque Theatre, as well as the formation of the opera and the decline of Neo-classicism at the Age of Enlightenment.
Type: Lecture
Assessment: Written examination

刃林 266 - 19th Century Greek Theatre
Instructor: Andreas Dimitriadis
Description: A historical survey of 19th c. Greek theatre with special emphasis on matters concerning the professional lives of the actors.
Type: Lecture
Assessment: Written examination

韧胖 366 - Autobiographies of Modern Greek Theatre Professionals as Historical Sources
Instructor: Andreas Dimitriadis
Description: Students will read and examine autobiographies of theatre professionals of this period and trace the historical accuracy of the information they contain. Analyses of the works will evolve around the question of their value and usefulness in spite of their historical accuracy.
Type: Seminar
Assessment: Written term paper

韧胖 372 - Greek Drama at the turn of the 20th Century
Instructor: Antonis Glytzouris
Description: During the last decade of the 19th century and the first of the 20th, an attempt for renewal took place in the Greek theatre. The students of this Seminar will investigate the native playwriting of the era (Xenopoulos, Kambysis, Psycharis, Palamas, Horn et al), as well as the reception of modern European drama (Ibsen, Maeterlinck, D' Annunzio et al).
Type: Seminar
Assessment: Written term paper

掏胖 140 - Music and ideology: The 'otherness' in the musical works of the Greek composers through the ages
Instructor: Yannis Plemmenos
Description: In this series of lectures attempt will be made to highlight the issue of the incorporation of foreign (non-Greek) compositions in the Greek repertoire and its percertion by the Greek musicians. In ancient Greece, two out of the three basic "tropoi" (modes), namely the Phrygian and the Lydian, were recognaised as being of foreign origin. In the Byzantine period, after the establishment of the Crusader State (1204), we trace the existance of "Francish" compositions and, following the foundation of the Second Bulgarian Kingdom, certain "Bulgarian" works appear. From the 15th to the 18th century, when the Greeks were under Turkish occupation, "Persian" compositions enter the Greek repertoire. In the 19th century, the Greeks, led by a Bavarian monarch, copy or imitate works in a "European style".
Type: Lecture
Assessment: Written examination

掏胖 361 - Musical humanism: The perpetuation of ancient-Greek harmonic theory in byzantine and modern-Greek world
Instructor: Yannis Plemmenos
Description: A Seminar that will deal with the revivalism of classical writings on Musical Science in Byzantine and post-Byzantine periods. Since, for a period of six hundred years (4th to 10th centuries A.D.), Greek musical writings were either persecuted or neglected due to their connection with the pagan past, the first humanism appeared in the 11th century, when the Platonist Michael Psellus wrote his Substantial Synopsis of Music. Soon after Constantinople was recovered from the Crusaders (1261), Byzantium, strugling for its survinal and in search of identity, encouraged the study and copy of classical writings (Harmonics by Manuel Vryennius and On Music by George Pachymeres, early 14th c.). During the Age of the Enlightenment, Greek "rayahs" came into contact with the European worship of classical civilization. Vassilios Stephanides' Draft on Music (Florence 1791) belongs to a third period o musical humanism.
Type: Seminar
Assessment: Written term paper







Spring Semester


Classical Studies - Ancient Greek Philology and Literature

僚种 020 - Greek Reading and Prose Class: Part II
Instructor: Athina Kavoulaki, Nikos Litinas, Anastasia-Erasmia Peponi
Description: This is the continuation of 'Greek Reading and Prose Class: Part I' (僚种 010) which is also a prerequisite for the attendance of this class. The aims and format are the same as in Part I but this time the syntax of the complex sentence will be the primary object of study. More particularly, the syntactical topics to be covered are: 1. coordination and subordination; 2. subordinate clauses: a. object, b. purpose, c. causal, d. result, e. conditional, f. concessive, g. temporal, h. relative and comparative, i. clauses after verbs of fearing and precaution; 3. interrogative and exclamatory sentences; 4. direct and indirect speech; simple and complex sentences in indirect discourse. Apart from syntax, accentuation, etymology and aspects of historical grammar will also receive particular attention during the course. Practice in Greek prose composition will include larger and more complicated texts. As in Part I, four texts (different from those of Part I) will be prescribed for individual reading. An extract of about ten lines will be dictated during exams for correct spelling and translation. Other 'seen' texts and Exercises will also be included in the exam paper.
Type: Exercise
Assessment: Written examination

僚种 104 - Hesiod's Opera et Dies
Instructor: Christos Tsagalis
Description: The aim of this course is to familiarize students with a new form of epic poetry which is very different from the well known Homeric epics. Topics to be discussed will include: the proem of this work in relation to that of the Theogony as well as those of the Homeric poems, the didactic tone of the epic, the function of Justice and Strife, the myth of generations of the human race, the cohesion of the poem and the relevance of its title to the content. The final exam will consist of three parts: a) passages for translation accompanied by questions on dialect and metrics b) passages for interpretation and analysis and c) questions of literary interest concerning Hesiod and his times.
Type: Lecture
Assessment: Written examination

僚种 111 - Elegiac poets (Selections)
Instructor: Odysseus Tsagarakis
Description: There is a short introduction to Archaic lyric poetry with particular emphasis on the appearance and development of the new literary genre, especially of the elegy, social-political conditions, influences of metre and language, from epic to lyric poetry. Studying of representative poets of the early and late period (martial elegy, gnomic, erotic, political) with readings of the original texts from Kallinos,Tyrtaios, Theognis, Mimnermnos, Solon, Archilochos etc. Commentary, translation.
Type: Lecture
Assessment: Written examination

僚种 144 - Sophocles' Philoctetes
Instructor: Athina Kavoulaki
Description: This is a text-based subject. The primary aim is to read and discuss the play from many different angles. We will read through the text scene by scene and discuss the interesting questions that arise, in the areas of: poetic use of language, structure and dramatic technique, mythology and cult, staging, characterisation, imagery, the interplay of speech and song and textual criticism. The first meeting will be an introduction into tragedy and the poetry of Sophocles. For the other weeks the following breakdown may be found useful: 1. prologue and exposition (vv. 1-134); 2. parodos and the hero's first appearance (vv. 135-316); 3. establishment of trust (vv. 317-518); 4. deception; the merchant's scene and the play's only stasimon (vv. 519-729); 5. agony and betrayal (vv. 730-926); 6. the hero helpless (vv. 927-1080); 7. lyric exchange and reversal (vv. 1081-1313); 8. the immovable hero and Heracles ex machina (vv. 1314-1471). The last three lectures will seek to work out a larger view of the play and of Sophoclean tragedy and to explore the following: a. the evolution of formal elements, b. current ideology, sophistry and the power of logos, c. the interplay of ritual and theatre, d. intertextual affinities: Homer and other. Students will be provided with a copy of a standard edition of the play (Teubner or OCT); handouts will be distributed at every session.
Type: Lecture
Assessment: Written examination

僚种 187 - Thucydides
Instructor: Yannis Tzifopoulos
Description: Readings from Thucydides' Histories 1, 2, 3, 6, 7 with emphasis on the author's historiographical method and his literary aim.
Type: Exercise
Assessment: Written examination

僚种 317 - Homeric Hymns
Instructor: Yannis Tzifopoulos
Description: The problematics of the Homeric Hymns in terms of their form, content and performance.
Type: Seminar
Assessment: Written term paper

僚种 350 - Women and Music in Greek Antiquity
Instructor: Anastasia-Erasmia Peponi
Description: By "music" we will understand the threefold combination of poetic utterance, instrumental accompaniment, and (sometimes) dance. The Seminar aims at investigating problems of the position of women in a) musical composition; b) musical performance; and c) musical reception (viewing and listening). The primary materials will comprise poetic as well as historical and philosophical texts. A required component, complementing the textual, will be visual representations, primarlly from vase painting.
Type: Seminar
Assessment: Written term paper

僚种 358 - Cretan Mythology
Instructor: Nikos Litinas
Description: Do the myths we know about Crete form the Cretan Mythology or the Mythology of Crete? What actually the Cretans thought as their own myths and what the other Greeks thought as the myths of Crete? What relation could be found among the myths about Crete and other areas of the ancient world? What could be regarded as history and what as a myth by the modern scholars? How the ancient Greek writers formed and sometimes reformed the myth? In this Seminar based on the above mentioned questions the details of the myths about a number of mythical persons as Minos, Europa, Minotaur, Daedalus, Ariadne, Theseus, Idomeneus etc. will be examined.
Type: Seminar
Assessment: Written term paper and oral presentation

僚种 361 - The nax舝hsiw in Egypt under Roman rule
Instructor: Sophie Kambitsis
Description: The flight is for the tax-payers the last resort to escape from the burden of taxes and compulsory public services. The fugitives abandon their official domicile (辒踑) and disappear in the populous cities or bands of robbers. Through a certain number of Greek documents (private letters, reports addressed to the authorities, official records, edicts of the prefects) we can see the consequences of the 巒ax舝hsiw (loss of man-power, decline in revenues, banditism) and the measures by which the problem was faced (reduction or moratorium of taxes, amnesty).
Type: Seminar
Assessment: Written term paper and oral presentation


Classical Studies - Latin Philology and Literature

肆种 020 - Intermediate Latin
Instructor: Stavros Frangoulidis, Christos Tsagalis
Description: Dependent clauses and reported speech. Latin prose composition. Extensive reading of prose or poetry with emphasis on syntax, translation and interpretation.
Type: Excersise
Assessment: Written examination

肆种 100 - A Survey of Latin Literature
Instructor: Michael Paschalis
Description: The course is an introductory survey of Latin Literature designed to familiarize students with the basic genres, their Greek origins and their reception. The reading and discussion of passages of ancient literary criticism constitutes an integral and vital part of the course. The textbook recommended for further reading is Michael von Albrecht's History of Latin Literature.
Type: Lecture
Assessment: Written examination

肆种 245 - Senekas
Instructor: Anastasios Nikolaidis
Description: This series of lectures will comprise an anthology of Seneca's Epistulae Morales in an attempt to manifest not only his ethical teaching, but also his contributions in wider philosophical and social problems as well as in matters of literary criticism.
Type: Lecture
Assessment: Written examination

肆种 300 - Virgil' s Aeneid
Instructor: Odysseus Tsagarakis
Description: Short review of the Roman epic, with particular reference to the Aeneid. Topic of the Seminar: "Sources and composition of the Aeneid". The focus point is the incorporation of traditional (Homeric) thematic motifs, scenes, descriptions etc. into Virgil's epic, their use for the glorification of the Roman past and Augustan ideology, influences and originality. Topics of study and discussion include the position of the gods, similes, descriptions etc.
Type: Seminar
Assessment: Written term paper

肆种 365 - Rites of passage in Apuleius' Metamorphoses
Instructor: Stavros Frangoulidis
Description: The Seminar offers a reading of Metamorphoses by Apuleius as an exposition of the narrator's (Lucius's) rites of passage and/or initiation processes into the mystic religion of Isis and Osiris.
Type: Seminar
Assessment: Written term paper


Byzantine and Modern Greek Philology - Byzantine Philology


BY种 010 - Greek palaeography and codicology. Introduction and practical Exercises
Instructor: Theocharis Detorakis
Description: Greek palaeography and codicology. Introduction and practical Exercises
Type: Seminar
Assessment: Written term paper

BY种 125 - Byzantine hymnography
Instructor: Theocharis Detorakis
Description: The genesis and evolution of Byzantine liturgical hymnography. The hymnography of the early church. The classical period (6th-8th centuries). The two major forms (kontakion and kanon). The major hymnographers and composers (Romanos the Melodist, John of Damascus, Kosmas the Melodist, Andrew of Crete). The Akathistos hymn and its problems. The later hymnographers (including Joseph the Hymnographer, Theophanes Graptos and Kassia). The "minor genres" of hymnography. Terminology of hymnography. Representative texts.
Type: Lecture
Assessment: Written examination

抡种 167 - Anna Comnena, Alexiad
Instructor: Marina Loukaki
Description: Anna Comnena's Alexiad is an outstanding example of Byzantine historiography and a major source for the period of the reign of Alexios Comnenos. The course will use selected extracts as a basis to discuss topics such as: the author's intentions, her method of exposition, Anna's sources and models, her presentation of persons and events, her language and style.
Type: Lecture
Assessment: Written examination

抡种 204 - The Byzantine Mirror of princes
Instructor: Ioannis Vassis
Description: Structure, political function and ideology, basic features. Autonomous and 'embedded' mirrors of princes, representative texts (Agapetus Diaconus, Photius the patriarch, Basil I, Theophylactus of Ochrid, Thomas Magistros, Nicephorus Blemmydes).
Type: Lecture
Assessment: Written examination

抡种 319 - The ideological world of Anna Comnena
Instructor: Marina Loukaki
Description: Within the historical work of Anna Comnena the Seminar will identify and discuss the author's views on imperial power, aristocracy, the Latins and foreigners in general, education and the intellectual concerns of her time.
Type: Seminar
Assessment: Written term paper and presentation

抡种 322 - Byzantine ekphrasis on works of art
Instructor: Ioannis Vassis
Description: Description of works of art as a rhetorical genre in the Byzantine era: Tradition and originality. Representative texts in prose and verse chosen from nine centuries: Asterios of Amaseia, Procopios of Gaza, Paul the Silentiary, Photius, Constantine the Rhodian, Nicolaos Mesarites etc.
Type: Seminar
Assessment: Written term paper and oral presentation


Byzantine and Modern Greek Philology - Modern Greek Philology and Literature

团种 100 - Introduction to Modern Greek Philology Instructors: Stefanos Kaklamanis, Stamatis Philippides
Description: The goal of this course is twofold. The first goal is to familiarise new students with the various branches and the interpretative methods of Modern Greek Philology, the theoretical discipline whose object of study is Modern Greek Literature. The second goal is to help students approximate to the Ideal (or proficient) Reader: to enable them to read neither more nor less than what the text provides, i.e. to accurately assimilate all the textual information. For this second goal Modern Greek poems and short stories are given in advance and subsequently discussed and analysed as a series of interpretative problems (from basic elements of plot to the total meaning of the text). The final examination consists of two parts: a) material which must be memorised, and material for discussion on the basis of open books, and b) analysis of a poem or a short story seen by the students for the first time.
Type: Lecture
Assessment: Written examination

团种 135 - Pastoral drama and poetry in Venetian Crete
Instructor: Alfred Vincent
Description: Two important works of the Cretan Renaissance are the pastoral comedy Panoria by Georgios Chortatsis (c. 1600) and the anonymous pastoral poem The Shepherdess, which was first printed in 1627 and enjoyed immense editorial success for over 200 years. Together with these works the course will study extracts from the Cretan adaptation of Guarini's Pastor fido, and from other texts which contain pastoral elements. Topics for discussion will include the relation of these works to folksong, to the social conditions of the time, and to the pastoral drama and poetry of 16th century Italy.
Type: Lecture
Assessment: Written examination

团种 154 - Phanariot poetry (1750-1821)
Instructor: Evripidis Garantoudis
Description: The course aims to examine the basic characteristics (thematics, form, connection with the social context) of the Phanariot poetical tradition from around the middle of the 18th century to the Revolution of 1821. Sample texts will be examined of the poets Ioannis Rizos Manes, Konstantinos-Kaisarios Dapontes, Alexandros Kalfoglou, Rigas Velestinlis, Georgios Sakellarios, Michail Perdikaris, Ioannis Vilaras, Athanasios Christopoulos, as well as texts from Zisis Daoutis' miscellany.
Type: Lecture
Assessment: Written examination

团种 196 - Women prose writers 1880-1930
Instructor: Angela Kastrinaki
Description: Some of the first attempts by Greek women (Alexandra Papadopoulou, Kalliroi Parren, Emily Dafni, Galateia Kazantzaki and others) to express themselves through literature will be examined in this course. Emphasis will be placed upon the contradictions in their work, upon their oscillation between emancipation and traditional conservatism. The course will be enriched by texts of male writers (Palamas, Xenopoulos) focusing on woman around the turn of the century.
Type: Lecture
Assessment: Written examination

团种 222 - Greek Surrealism
Instructor: Christina Dounia
Description: The background to the emergence of Surrealism in Greece. The first Greek Surrealists: Embirikos and Engonopoulos. Elytis' connection with Surrealism, and the case of Gatsos. The influence of the movement on poets of the first post-war generation: M. Sachtouris, N. Valaoritis, E. Kaknavatos, D. P. Papaditsas.
Type: Lecture
Assessment: Written examination

团种 263 - Theories of aesthetics and poetics in Greece (1800-1880)
Instructor: Litsa Hatzopoulou
Description: Part A: Enlightenment period. A presentation of the more important theories on poetry from the studies on rhetoric and aesthetics by Enlightenment writers (Oikonomos, Vardalachos, Megdanis). Part B: 1. Theoretical writings of the Romantics (Solomos, Rangavis, Roidis, Vernardakis). 2. The aesthetic basis of the poetry competitions. 3. Theories of aesthetics published as separate studies (e.g. Stratoulis). Part C: The theoretical controversies at the end of the Romantic period (Rangavis-Mistriotis, Roidis-Vlachos). N.B. If the area "Comparative Literature - Literary Theory") is already covered, the lecture course could be given a code number from the area "1650-1850" or "1850-1930).
Type: Lecture
Assessment: Written examination

团种 307 - The Heptanesian manuscript of Erotokritos
Instructor: Stefanos Kaklamanis
Description: The Seminar will be based on an analytical description of the illustrated manuscript of Erotokritos (British Library, ms. Harleian 5644). As well as the system of illustration, it will examine the linguistic changes made to the text of Erotokritos by the Heptanesian copyist through a comparison with the first printed edition (1713).
Type: Seminar
Assessment: Written term paper and oral presentation

团种 314 - Seventeenth-century historical poems
Instructor: Alfred Vincent
Description: Some verse chronicles were widely known in the seventeenth century and are a characteristic feature of post-Byzantine culture. Texts studied in the Seminar will include the narratives by Stavrinos and Palamidis on Michael the Brave, the History by Matthew of Myra and the verse chronicles on the Cretan War by Bounialis and Diakrousis. There will be discussion of topics such as: the relation of the texts to (other) historical sources; narrative techniques; mentalities and ideologies; the process of "mythification" of recent events.
Type: Seminar
Assessment: Written term paper and oral presentation

团种 381 - Literary revision in the work of the Generation of 1930
Instructor: Angela Kastrinaki
Description: A comparison between successive editions of narratives by writers of the Generation of 1930 with the aim of discovering changes in their aesthetic and ideological positions.
Type: Seminar
Assessment: Written term paper and oral presentation

团种 387 - The writer as critic (1922-1967)
Instructor: Christina Dounia
Description: A number of writers have practised literary criticism either in the form of reviews of new or contemporary publications, or through the evaluation or re-evaluation of older literary works; typical examples are Emmanuel Roidis, K. Palamas, G. Xenopoulos, T. Agras, G. Seferis, O. Elytis, A. Kotzias and T. Sinopoulos. The aim of the Seminar is to indicate the way in which the work of criticism communicates with literary creation, and to bring to light critical texts which remain scattered among various newspapers and journals.
Type: Seminar
Assessment: Written term paper and oral presentation


Linguistics

盟僦 108 - The history of Linguistics
Instructor: Evangelia Thomadaki
Description: A comprehensive description of the development of linguistics as an independent scientific branch from antiquity to the present day, focusing on the evolution of ideas, objectives, questions and explanations provided by language research.
Type: Lecture
Assessment: Written examination

盟僦 113 - Diachronic Syntax
Instructor: Georgia Catsimali
Description: Principles and processes such as syncretism, analogy, reanalysis, grammaticalisation are used to interpret the time course of syntactic change as it is attested in the history of Greek. The issues of data drawn from texts, of inaccuracies attested during transmission of the language and the role of Universal Grammar are discussed.
Type: Lecture
Assessment: Written examination

盟僦 165 - Syntax I
Instructor: Elena Anagnostopoulou
Description: This course is an introduction to current syntactic theory, covering the principles that govern: (i) Phrase Structure (categories and features, the composition of phrases and sentences), (ii) Thematic-relations and the Lexicon-Syntax mapping (relations between predicates and their arguments in the lexicon and the way this information is mapped onto syntactic representations), (iii) Case (the role of Case in the distribution of noun phrases), (iv) Movement (dependencies between syntactic constituents) and (iv) Binding (the interpretation of different types of noun phrases).
Type: Lecture
Assessment: Written examination

盟僦 201 - The language instinct
Instructor: Alexis Kalokairinos
Description: This course is conceived as an alternative introduction to the modern sciences of language from the now prevalent cognitive perspective. The course is based on Steven Pinker's best selling book of the same name. Basic questions in modern linguistics are approached from the viewpoint of contemporary psychology and biology of language. Central themes include the question of innateness of linguistic competence and the broader question of the relation of language to the mind.
Type: Lecture
Assessment: Written examination

盟僦 309 - A typological approach to modern greek grammar
Instructor: Elena Anagnostopoulou
Description: The structure of Modern Greek from a typological perspective. Salient features of Modern Greek, comparison of Modern Greek to other languages of the world and formulation of the structural similarities and differences between Modern Greek and these languages, often in the form of parameters. Some of the characteristics of Modern Greek that are particularly relevant in this respect include: the internal structure of nominal constituents, the absence of infinitives and the form and properties of subjunctives, non-obligatoriness of subjects (the null subject parameter), the syntax of pronominal clitics (their position, their form, clitic doubling constructions), reflexive pronouns, case morphology and freedom of word order, the syntax of ditransitive predicates, non-active voice morphology, the forms of complementation. Students are expected to lead discussion of a few papers on a syntactic phenomenon during the course and will participate in the discussion of papers on other syntactic phenomena.
Type: Seminar
Assessment: Written term paper and oral presentation

盟僦 325 - Aspects of Helenistic Koine
Instructor: Evangelia Thomadaki
Description: The Seminar offers an in-depth analysis of Hellenistic Koine, i.e. of the phonological, morphological, syntactic and lexical changes that affected the Greek language in the Hellenistic age, as evidenced in texts and other sources.
Type: Seminar
Assessment: Written term paper and oral presentation

盟僦 334 - From Ancient Greek to Modern Greek: Changes in the structure of the language
Instructor: Georgia Catsimali
Description: The topics of the Seminar concern: Word Order and its reflexes for syntactic theory, syncretism of Cases and the structure of Noun Phrase, the evolution of Present Perfect, changes in Moods (eg. subjunctive), the loss of Infinitives and Participles.
Type: Seminar
Assessment: Written term paper and oral presentation


Theater-Cinema Studies and Musicology

刃林 101 - A Review of the History of European Theatre. B': From the Age of Enlightment up to the 20th century
Instructor: Antonis Glytzouris
Description: The second part of the introduction to the history of European theatre presents in brief the theatre at the Age of Enlightenment and Romanticism, Realism and Symbolism, the emergence of the director, the avant-garde movements of the 20th century, the Inter War years, the Epic theatre, the Theatre of the Absurd and the experiments of the 1960's.
Type: Lecture
Assessment: Written examination

刃林 222 - Theories of Acting: K. Stanislavski - Lee Strasberg
Instructor: Andreas Dimitriadis
Description: This course will focus on the predominant theoretical and practical training of 20th century actors, K. Stanislavski's "System": the historical background of its birth within the Moscow Art Theatre, its basic principles, and its spread to America, where significant differences emerged, through the teaching of Lee Strasberg at the Actors Studio, New York.
Type: Lecture
Assessment: Written examination

韧胖 265 - European and Greek theatre in the age of the Enlightenment
Instructor: Theodore Hadjipantazis
Description: Outline of a very significant period in the history of Western theatre, that made possible the transition from the practices of the late Renaissance to those of 19th century Romanticism and Realism. Identification of the special caracteristics of the relevant Greek endeavors, before and after the War of Independence, that resulted in the adoption of an unfamiliar new artistic idiom.
Type: Lecture
Assessment: Written examination

韧胖 309 - The theatre of Nikos Kazantzakis
Instructor: Theodore Hadjipantazis
Description: Research in the ideological and philosophical background of Nikos Kazantzakis' dramatic works, with particular attention to his contemporary intellectual and artistic activity. His literary models and associates, his themes and heroes, formal experimentation etc.
Type: Seminar
Assessment: Written term paper

韧胖 367 - The Revival of Ancient Greek Drama on the Post-war Greek Stage
Instructor: Andreas Dimitriadis
Description: Through the study of selected performances, the institutions and people that influenced the process will be examined, as well as the predominant tendencies in directing, designing and acting style.
Type: Seminar
Assessment: Written term paper
韧胖 380 - Ideological and Artistic trends at the Greek theatre of the Inter-War Years
Instructor: Antonis Glytzouris
Description: The InterWar years constitute an unexplored field in modern Greek theatre studies. This Seminar provides an opportunity for the students to be acquainted with this unknown era; they'll research various aspects of Greek theatre of this era (troupes, playwriting, stage-direction etc), as well as its ideological trends (Greekness, folksiness, etc).
Type: Seminar
Assessment: Written term paper
释胖 382 - Representations of History in the Greek cinema
Instructor: Elise-Anne Delveroudi
Description: Contemporary political history in Greece splits into two parts, the first one from the end of the 2nd World War until 1974 and the second one from 1974 to the present. These two periods correspond to two related periods in the history of the Greek cinema; the commercial (until the late 1970's) and the art cinema (from the late 1970's until our days). Through the presentation and analysis of a number of films, the students will learn how and why the comercial and the art cinema presented historical personalities and facts, and how the script and filmmakers' choices were guided by the main approaches towards history, expressed by left and right political ideologies.
Type: Seminar
Assessment: Written term paper

掏胖 181 - Music and aesthetics: Greek attitudes towards music perception in the age of the Enlightenment
Instructor: Yannis Plemmenos
Description: A series of lectures focusing on the Greek writings on musical aesthetics in the age of the Enlightenment. In 18th century Ottoman Empire, music -as every other artistic activity- was controlled by the Quranic law and its appreciation was restricted, if not non-existant. At the same time, one of the ethnic groups of the Empire, the Greeks, began to develop a liberal attitude towards music, mainly due to their Hellenic heritage, as well as their exposure to the ideas of the European Enlightenment. Consequently, the Greeks sought to combine perceptions, ranging from classical writings by Plato, Aristotle and other "harmonic" writers, to contemporary Western theories of aesthetics, mainly by German and French writers, and develop them into a harmonious whole.
Type: Lecture
Assessment: Written examination

掏胖 348 - Lied muss gehort, nicht gesehen werden: Folk song as a unity of music and text in 19th century Greece
Instructor: Yannis Plemmenos
Description: Inpired by the famous aphorism of J. G. Herder ("Song should be heard, not just looked at"), this Seminar will deal with folk song as an inseperable unity of text and music. Emphasis will be given to Greek folk song, whitch, begining with early 19th century, was studied as a literary monument rather then a song per se, that is a synthesis of verse, melody and rhythm (dance). This neglect led to the absence of gathering universal theoretical principles of folk music, as they appear in other genres, such as classical or church music. However, contrary to Greek practices, other folk traditions (including Turkish) have developed a coherent system of musical classification of their folk songs, which will be projected on Greek folk song to establish some similarities.
Type: Seminar
Assessment: Written term paper