WINTER SEMESTER

CLASSICAL STUDIES


ANCIENT GREEK PHILOLOGY AND LITERATURE

僚种010  -  Greek Reading and Prose Class: Part I
Instructor:
Demos Spatharas, Kostas Apostolakis, Nikos Litinas, Eva Astyrakaki, Athena Kavoulaki
Description: The course is intended primarily for first year undergraduates and presupposes (at least) intermediate knowledge of ancient Greek. It aims a) at extending the students' knowledge of the morphology and syntax of the Ancient Greek language (Attic dialect), b) at improving their reading skills, and c) at developing their skill in Greek prose composition. Every three-hour teaching session will include a. the reading and translation of an excerpt from a Greek prose text (of the fifth or fourth century BC. mainly), together with analytical discussion of important grammatical and syntactical features; b. the theoretical presentation of and Exercises in an important syntactical topic; c. an Exercise in Greek prose writing with features of the syntactical structure in discussion. The detailed theoretical analysis refers mainly to the syntax of the simple sentence. The topics to be covered are: a. the use of cases, and in particular genitive, dative and accusative; b. the use of moods in independent sentences; c. the use of tenses (of and outside of the indicative); d. the infinitive; e. the participle. Throughout the course particular emphasis will be also placed upon issues of accentuation, vowel and consonant change and declension of nouns and verbs. Handouts with the appropriate theoretical material and Exercises will be distributed at every meeting. A basic bibliography will be also available at the beginning of the course.
Type: Exercise Assessment: Written examination

僚种100  -  Introduction to Classical Philology
Instructor:
Lucia Athanassaki
Description: Introduction to the major literary genres, to metre, and the ancillary disciplines of classical philology.
Type: Lecture  -  Assessment: Written examination

僚种103  -  Hesiod, Theogony
Instructor:
Athena Kavoulaki
Description: This is a text-based subject. The primary aim is to read and discuss the Hesiodic work from many different angles. We will read through the text and discuss the interesting questions that arise in the areas of language, structure, epic technique, mythological tradition etc. The importance of Hesiodic myth for modern analyses of ancient Greek thought and culture will also receive particular attention.
Type: Lecture  -  Assessment: Written examination.

僚种119  -  Bacchylides
Instructor:
Lucia Athanassaki
Description: Reading and interpretation of epinician and dithyrambic odes in light of genre conventions and the sociocultural background.
Type: Lecture  -  Assessment: Written examination

僚种176  -  Aristophanes, Ecclesiazusae
Instructor:
Nikos Charalabopoulos
Description: In the Ecclesiazusae (391 BC) under the leadership of Praxagora the women of Athens seize power and put into practice a radical program of common ownership of goods and equal distribution of wealth so that any social inequality may be abolished and the city may be saved. The play combines the theme of the foundation of Utopias (Birds) and that of gynaecocracy (Lysistrata), while, at the same time, foreshadowing the transition from Old to Middle Comedy (marginalisation of the Chorus, absence of the parabasis, ordinary cast). In addition to those issues, special emphasis is placed on questions of staging and the overall integration of the play in its theatrical and historical context.
Type: Lecture  -  Assessment: Written examination

僚种189  -  Xenophon, Expeditio Cyri
Instructor:
Nikos Charalabopoulos
Description: In the seven books of the Anabasis Xenophon tells the astonishing story of the Ten Thousand, a Greek expeditionary force that was recruited in Cyrus' army, fought at the battle at Cunaxa (401 BC), and despite Cyrus' death, managed to march to safety crossing the Asia Minor plateaus and reaching the coastal cities of Pontos and Thrace. Through a close reading of Books 2 and 3 a couple of theoretical issues are raised, such as the generic identity of the Anabasis or the narrative technique. At the same time, due emphasis is given to the significance attributed by Xenophon's readership to some central notions of the work, namely Panhellenism and the ultimate superiority of a united community of citizens-soldiers.
Type: Lecture  -  Assessment: Written examination

僚种261  -  Antiphon, Against the Stepmother
Instructor:
Kostas Apostolakis
Description: This speech is the briefest among the survived speeches of Antiphon and it is composed as an accusation for poisoning. 蓆s best qualities consist mainly in the emotion, which is intensified in passages with tragic colour, and the vivid narrative. After a brief introduction to Ancient Homicide Law and to logographer Antiphon, the speech will be read, translated and commented upon. Matters of text criticism, style and interpretation will be discussed, and the oratorical strategy will be set out with special emphasis on the critical examination of the means of persuasion.
Type: Lecture  -  Assessment: Written examination

僚种332  -  Plutarch's language and style
Instructor:
Anastasios Nikolaidis
Description: Although Plutarch is one of the most important authors of late antiquity, his language and style (only loosely following Atticism) have not been studied thoroughly. In this seminar we shall attempt a rather meticulous examination of Plutarch's written word (vocabulary, grammatical peculiarities, figures of speech, etc.) tracing and classifying the hallmarks of his language and style.
Type: Seminar  -  Assessment: Oral presentation and written paper

A胖375  -  Aspects of private life in the speeches of the Attic orators
Instructor:
Dimos Spatharas
Description: In this seminar we shall examine speeches written by several orators (Isokrates, Lysias, Demosthenes, Apollodoros, Aiskhines). The aim of the seminar is twofold: (a) to look into the strategy of the speeches and introduce students to some basic aspects of Athenian law; (b) to examine the information that we derive from the speeches concerning the private life of classical Athens. Special emphasis will be given to the following issues: (i) the notion of oikos; (ii) the relationships between men and women; (iii) homosexuality; (iv) the control of violence and the concept of hybris.
Type: Seminar  -  Assessment: Oral presentation and written paper

僚种381  -  Anthology of Greek Prose
Instructor:
Konstantinos Spanoudakis
Description: The seminar aims at approaching in terms of style and interpretation a wide range of texts, from the first appearance of Greek prose to Socrates Scholasticus in the 5th cent. A.D.
Type: Seminar  -  Assessment: Oral presentation and written paper

LATIN PHILOLOGY AND LITERATURE

肆种010  -  Elementary Latin
Instructor:
Kostas Spanoudakis, Eva Astyrakaki
Description: Use of the cases, infinitive, participle, supine, gerund and gerundive; tenses, moods, consecutio temporum. Latin prose composition.
Type: Exercise Assessment: Written examination

肆种139  -  An anthology of Republican and Augustan poetry
Instructor:
Michael Paschalis
Description: Reading and commenting on selected passages of Roman comedy, epic, lyric and elegiac poetry, bucolic and didactic poetry, and satire.
Type: Lecture  -  Assessment: Written examination

肆种182  -  Tacitus, Historiae
Instructor:
Stavros Frangoulidis
Description: reading of Tacitus' Histories 1 with an emphasis on the literary and historical aspects.
Type: Lecture  -  Assessment: Written examination

肆种334  -  Apuleius' Metamorphoses and the Greek idealistic novels
Instructor:
Stavros Frangoulidis
Description: Reading of Apuleius' Metamorphoses in relation to the Greek idealistic novels.
Type: Seminar  -  Assessment: Oral presentation and written paper


BYZANTINE AND MODERN GREEK PHILOLOGY


SUBDIVISION OF BYZANTINE PHILOLOGY

抡种100  -  Introduction to the Byzantine Philology
Instructor:
Ioannis Vassis
Description: The lecture course is intended for first-year students and includes: a short history of Byzantine studies; basic handbooks, dictionaries and journals; an account of the literary genres which were cultivated in Byzantium; reading of and commentary on selected extracts.
Type: Lecture  -  Assessment: Written examination

抡种167  -  Anna Comnena, Alexias
Instructor:
Marina Loukaki
Description: In our courses we are going to study the personality and the culture of the writer, Anna Comnena. We are going to discuss the content, the structure and the style of her historical work. Consequently, we are going to read and comment extracts of Alexias, representative of the writer's opinions about her family, the crusaders and generally the foreigners, the education and the heresies of her time.
Type: Lecture  -  Assessment: Written examination

抡种211  -  Introduction to the Byzantine Epistolography
Instructor:
Emmanuel Patedakis
Description: ---
Type: Lecture  -  Assessment: Written examination

抡种335  -  The Literary Aspects of the Byzantine Epistolography
Instructor:
Emmanuel Patedakis
Description: ---
Type: Seminar  -  Assessment: Oral presentation and written paper

抡种370  -  Greek Paleography and Codicology
Instructor:
Ioannis Vassis
Description: The evolution of Greek scribal handwriting (4th-16th cent.)
Type: Seminar  -  Assessment: Oral presentation and written paper

SUBDIVISION OF MODERN GREEK PHILOLOGY

NE种126  -  Printed literature of the 16th century
Instructor:
Stefanos Kaklamanis
Description: The contribution of printing to the diffusion of the written culture and to the formation of a literature reading public. The world of the popular literature books in the 16th century: authors, printers, editors, readers. The formation of the first printed corpus of the Modern Greek literature. The reception of chapbooks. Analysis of the works Apokopos, Apollonius, Anthos Chariton, Theseis, Chapbook of Donkey, King of Scotland, etc.
Type: Lecture  -  Assessment: Written examination

团种156  -  Poetry before the Greek Revolution: Rigas Pheraios, Vilaras, Christopoulos
Instructor:
Maria Mathioudaki
Description: ---
Type: Lecture  -  Assessment: Written examination

团种212  -  The poetic work of C. P. Cavafy
Instructor:
Dimitris Polychronakis
Description: The subject-matter of this class is the poetry of C. P. Cavafy in the wider context of European aestheticism.
Type: Lecture  -  Assessment: Written examination

团种234  -  The Poetry of the 1930 generation: G. Seferis
Instructor:
Christina Dounia
Description: ---
Type: Lecture  -  Assessment: Written examination

团种265  -  Questions concerning the reading of a literary text: Searching for the intention of the text
Instructor:
Stamatis N. Philippides
Description: In the lectures either short stories or sequences from novels will be used as an illustration of how the literary text provides the reader with information concerning its own reading and understanding. The readings are based on Eco's notion of the "intention of the text", a methodological concept which is formed in opposition to both the "writer's intention" and the "reader's intention".
Type: Lecture  -  Assessment: Written examination

NE种309  -  Poetics of the Greek historical poems
Instructor:
Stefanos Kaklamanis
Description: The intertextual dialogue among the works of the Greek historical poems (1453-1669) according to the conventions of the literary genre and the use of the traditional material (themes, motifs, imagery, etc.).
Type: Seminar  -  Assessment: Oral presentation and written paper

团种313  -  History of the Greek book: 19th century
Instructor:
Maria Mathioudaki
Description: ---
Type: Seminar  -  Assessment: Oral presentation and written paper

NE种365  -  Women's novels and patriarchal society
Instructor:
Stamatis N. Philippides
Description: Objective of this seminar is the direct and/or transformed reflection of patriarchal structures in women's novels in which the heroine is either a school teacher (Elli Alexiou 3rd Christian Girls' School, 1934; Lilika Nakou Misses Doremi, 1955; Katina Pappa In A Girls' High School, 1960) or an artist (Emily Daphne Smaro's Talent, 1924; L. Nakou Gone Astray, 1935; etc).
Type: Seminar  -  Assessment: Oral presentation and written paper


LINGUISTICS


盟僦100  -  Introduction to Theoretical Linguistics
Instructor:
Alexis Kalokerinos
Description: This course serves as a general introduction to Theoretical Linguistics and is mainly aimed at students encountering the scientific study of language for the first time. The first three lectures cover basic issues which have given rise to widespread misunderstandings, all of are concerned with the nature of language. The following lectures provide an introductory overview of the main fields of Theoretical Linguistics, i.e. Phonetics and Phonology, Morphology, Syntax (with an emphasis on Generative Grammar), Semantics and Pragmatics.
Type: Lecture  -  Assessment: Written examination

盟僦109  -  Language Typology
Instructor:
Elena Anagnostopoulou
Description: An introductory level course on language typology organized in three parts: (i) general issues, (ii) theoretical frameworks, (iii) approaches to specific problems. In the first part, the students are introduced to the notions of Language Universals and Language-specific properties. A number of phenomena from a variety of genetically unrelated languages are presented to show that there are properties all languages have in common, and there are systematic constraints on cross-linguistic variation. The second part introduces the students to the main fields of typological research, from the Prague School to the Generative Grammar tradition. The objective of this part is to help students understand the diversity of theoretical orientations and practical methodologies underlying the research on typology. The third part compares the various approaches by presenting specific linguistic problems and outlining how these have been dealt with in the frameworks in question.
Type: Lecture  -  Assessment: Written examination

盟僦147  -  Phonology I
Instructor:
Ioanna Kappa
Description: This course provides an introduction to the basic concepts of Generative Phonology and central phonological issues will be discussed: universals, variation, markedness, distinctive features, syllabic structure, phonological rules, stress.
Type: Lecture  -  Assessment: Written examination

盟僦157  -  Introduction to ancient Greek dialectology
Instructor:
Dimitra Delli
Description: A systematic historical survey of ancient Greek dialects. In particular, the main aim of this presentation will be: 1. The description of Greek dialects or dialectic groups (sources, description problems and methods of analysis). 2. The dialectic affinity (presentation of dialectic characteristics and isoglottic lines, which reveal associations between adjacent dialects; classification of dialects). 3. Historical synthesis of dialectic diversity during 2nd millennium B.C. (Mycenaean dialect, non-Doric dialects, western Doric dialects, Doric "descents" issue).
Type: Lecture  -  Assessment: Written examination.

盟僦175  -  Structure of Modern Greek Language
Instructor:
Georgia Katsimali
Description: The course explores the notion of "grammar" vs. grammatical theory, the use of reference grammar, vs. pedagogical grammar and the different perspectives of grammatical analysis (descriptive, prescriptive, explanatory, etc.). By comparing different studies of Modern Greek grammar (Triadafyllides, Mackridge, Clairis-Babiniotis, Holton-Mackridge---Philippaki), we dwell in main characteristics of Modern Greek in terms of phonology, morphology, syntax and semantics.
Type: Lecture  -  Assessment: Written examination.

盟僦310  -  Issues of phonological analysis within the Optimality Theory
Instructor:
Ioanna Kappa
Description: In-depth study of the theoretical framework of Optimality Theory. After an introduction, a tentative list of topics and readings will be given and the students have to develop their projects and report on their progress several times during the semester.
Type: Seminar  -  Assessment: Oral presentation and written paper

盟僦321  -  Topics in the Grammar of Modern Greek
Instructor:
Georgia Katsimali
Description: A series of topics which highlight the structure of Modern Greek are contrasted with their equivalent phenomena in other languages.
1. Word order in Modern Greek
2. Topicalisation and focalisation in Modern Greek
3. Correspondences of grammatical relations and Case
4. Verb transitivity and structural patterns
5. Linguistic terminology in traditional grammar and linguistic analysis
Type: Seminar  -  Assessment: Oral presentation and written paper

盟僦357  -  Introduction to ancient Greek epigraphy
Instructor:
Dimitra Delli
Description: This seminar is related to the Lecture 盟僦-157 (Introduction to ancient Greek dialectology). It deals with: 1. The introduction to Ancient Greek epigraphy (inscriptions' role and usage in antiquity; how inscriptions attribute to the study of Greek language history, origins and evolution of Greek writing system, inscriptions' dating, epigraphic symbols, important publications of Greek inscriptions). 2. A selection of epigraphic texts.
Type: Seminar  -  Assessment: Oral presentation and written paper


THEATRE-CINEMA STUDIES AND MUSICOLOGY


韧胖265  -  The Romantic Movement in European and Modern Greek Theatre
Instructor:
Antonis Glytzouris
Description: The emergence of Romanticism and the European theatre, the main features and an outline of the Romantic Movement in German, English, Russian and French theatre. The reception of Romanticism in Modern Greek Theatre from 1830s up to Neo-Romanticism, its relations with Classicism etc. The course will put emphasis on top European and Greek romantic dramas of Schiller, Kleist, Griboyedov, Hugo, P. Soutsos, A. R. Rangabes, D. Vernardakis, Sp. Vasileiadis.
Type: Lecture  -  Assessment: Written examination

释胖159  -  History in Cinema
Instructor:
Eliza-Anna Delveroudi
Description: ---
Type: Lecture  -  Assessment: Written examination

市林158  -  Artistic Movements of the European Cinema I
Instructor:
Panayiota Mini
Description: European Film Movements I. The course will focus on three European film movements: German expressionism, Soviet montage, and French Poetic Realism. We will examine each movement in depth, will situate it in its historical and artistic contexts, and will discuss the movements' major directors and films. A film screening will follow each lecture. Type: Lecture. Assessment: Final Examination.
Type: Lecture  -  Assessment: Written examination

掏胖362  -  Rempetiko
Instructor:
Anastasios Hapsoulas
Description: Rempetiko is particularly interesting mainly due to the fact that it combines different traditions and cultural elements. The aim of this seminar is to expose the artistic value of Rempetiko and its individuality, compared to other types of Greek traditional music. This aim will be achieved through the investigation of its roots, the presentation of its creators, the study of historical and social conditions at the time of its appearance and evaluation and the approach of its musicological, philological and organological characteristic.
Type: Seminar  -  Assessment: Oral presentation and written paper

绦林182  -  History of European music : from romanticism to the 20th century
Instructor:
Anastasios Hapsoulas
Description: This lecture refers the evolution of European music in the romantic period and the 20th century. The musical forms of these two periods will be studied as well as, organological issues, the evolution of the theory of composition, biographies of the most important composers and topics of music aesthetics. Special attention will be paid to the mondernization of 20th century music which is characterizes of the pluralism expressionism, futurism, neoclassic as well as electronically synthesized music, will be studied.
Type: Lecture  -  Assessment: Written examination


SPRING SEMESTER

CLASSICAL STUDIES


ANCIENT GREEK PHILOLOGY AND LITERATURE

僚种020  -  Greek Reading and Prose Class: Part II
Instructor:
Nikos Charalambopoulos, Eleni Karambela, Eva Astyrakaki, Kostas Apostolakis
Description: This is the continuation of 'Greek Reading and Prose Class: Part I' (僚种010) which is also a prerequisite for the attendance of this class. The aims and format are the same as in Part I but this time the syntax of the complex sentence will be the primary object of study. More particularly, the syntactical topics to be covered are: 1. coordination and subordination; 2. subordinate clauses: a. object, b. purpose, c. causal, d. result, e. conditional, f. concessive, g. temporal, h. relative and comparative, i. clauses after verbs of fearing and precaution; 3. interrogative and exclamatory sentences; 4. direct and indirect speech; simple and complex sentences in indirect discourse. Apart from syntax, accentuation, etymology and aspects of historical grammar will also receive particular attention during the course. Practice in Greek prose composition will include larger and more complicated texts. As in Part I, four texts (different from those of Part I) will be prescribed for individual reading. An extract of about ten lines will be dictated during exams for correct spelling and translation. Other 'seen' texts and Exercises will also be included in the exam paper.
Type: Exercise Assessment: Written examination

僚种060  -  Introduction to Papyrology
Instructor:
Nikos Litinas
Description: The aim of this Exercise is to provide general background information on the writing materials (especially the papyrus), the forms of the ancient books (roll and codex) and the discovery of the papyri, mainly in Egypt, during the last two centuries. Moreover, the reading (from photographs) and the interpretation of selected texts written on papyri or ostraca etc. will allow students to understand the changes and evolution of the Greek language and the letterforms for a period of almost 1000 years (350 B.C. - A.D. 641).
Type: Exercise Assessment: Written examination

僚种102  -  Homer, Odyssey
Instructor:
Yannis Tzifopoulos
Description: Extensive readings from Homer's Odyssey with emphasis on its composition and poetics
Type: Lecture  -  Assessment: Written examination

僚种130  -  Bucolic Poetry
Instructor:
Konstantinos Spanoudakis
Description: Lectures will discuss the genesis and features of the bucolic genre, as sampled from the texts of Theocritus, Moschus and Bion. Occasional reference to their influence mainly on Virgil will be made.
Type: Lecture  -  Assessment: Written examination

僚种149  -  Euripides, Hippolytus
Instructor:
Eleni Karambela
Description: Euripides' Hippolytus, the tragedy that develops in the the field between love and chastity and investigates the borders of audacity and of "aid(s", will be our subject of lectures for the spring semester. Especially we will be concerned with issues related to the creation of the dramatic meaning of the play such as the following: dramatic organization and use characters; use of the Chorus; mythological pretext, themes and motifs; fuction of language, of imagery and of props; scenic and dramatic space and time; modern perception and productions of the play.
Type: Lecture  -  Assessment: Written examination

僚种186  -  Herodotus
Instructor:
Yannis Tzifopoulos
Description: Readings from Herodotus' Histories Books 1, 8 and 9 with emphasis on the author's historiographical method and his literary aim.
Type: Lecture  -  Assessment: Written examination

僚种216  -  Plato, Banquet
Instructor:
Anastasios Nikolaidis
Description: The Banquet belongs to the dialogues of Plato's maturity and, perhaps, is the most literary of all. In the context of an aristocratic (mainly) social institution, the symposium, Plato discusses another institution of the Athenian elite, pederasty. Departing from a concrete practice among the circles of the Athenian aristocracy and elsewhere, Plato proceeds (through the views of the fellow-drinkers) to a comprehensive consideration of the nature of love (eros), which he incorporates in his philosophical system and ultimately connects it with the Idea of Good (eros is the means, the emotional force that propels us on the road to the Good).
Type: Lecture  -  Assessment: Written examination

僚种302  -  Euripides, Ion
Instructor:
Lucia Athanassaki
Description: Reading and interpretation of Euripides' Ion with emphasis on the political significance of the play.
Type: Seminar  -  Assessment: Oral presentation and written paper

僚种306  -  Spurious (?) forensic speeches from the Corpus Demosthenicum
Instructor:
Kostas Apostolakis
Description: In this seminar we have selected some -probably spurious- speeches from the corpus Demosthenicum, which reveal aspects of Fourth - Century Athenian institutions and procedures with economical dimension, like leitourgiai and lease of public property. Specifically, the forty-second speech ( Against Phainippus) contains valuable information for the antidosis (exchange of properties) ; the forty-seventh (Against Euergus and Mnesibulus) and the- written by Apollodoros- fiftieth (Against Polycles) concern trierarhia (naval administration) ; and the thirty- seventh (Against Pantainetus) is about ownership of property and lease of state-mines in Attica. These speeches will be analyzed from historical and rhetorical point of view, in order to be shown both the real facts and the oratorical strategy.
Type: Seminar  -  Assessment: Oral presentation and written paper

AE种308  -  Aristophanes' Thesmophoriazusae.
Instructor:
Athena Kavoulaki
Description: The general aim is to teach third- and fourth-year students major research techniques as well as oral and written argumentation and presentation. Every student will have to prepare a paper which he/ she must present orally and in a written form. The topics of the assignments will fall within the larger area of the title of the seminar, i.e. issues relating to the interpretation of Aristophanic plays and particularly the Thesmophoriazusae.
Type: Seminar  -  Assessment: Oral presentation and written paper

僚种320  -  Resisting Rome: The reconstruction of Greek identity in the Roman period
Instructor:
Nikos Charalabopoulos
Description: The Greek intellectuals living under Roman rule promoted the reaffirmation and consolidation of the Hellenic identity as a means against the imminent cultural assimilation owing to Rome's usurpation of constitutive elements of Hellenism. The Second Sophistic movement, the idealisation of the classical period, and the emergence of Atticism exhibit the need of the conquered Greeks to claim for themselves a space of their own (culture, glorious past) so that they may compete successfully with the conquering Romans. On the evidence from the authors of the period (e.g. Plutarch, Dio Chrysostom, Pausanias) the present seminar aims at mapping out the various levels in which this struggle for self-determination and survival takes place.
Type: Seminar  -  Assessment: Oral presentation and written paper

LATIN PHILOLOGY AND LITERATURE

肆种020  -  Intermediate Latin
Instructor:
Eva Astyrakaki, Stavros Frangoulidis
Description: Dependent clauses and reported speech. Latin prose composition. Extensive reading of prose or poetry with emphasis on syntax, translation and interpretation.
Type: Excersise Assessment: Written examination


肆种100  -  A Survey of Latin Literature
Instructor:
Michael Paschalis
Description: The course is an introductory survey of Latin Literature designed to familiarize students with the basic genres, their Greek origins and their reception. The reading and discussion of passages of ancient literary criticism constitutes an integral and vital part of the course. The textbook recommended for basic reading is Ch. IV of Fritz Graf's Eileitung in die Lateinische Philologie.
Type: Lecture  -  Assessment: Written examination

肆种146  -  Plautus, Mercator
Instructor:
Stavros Frangoulidis
Description: Metatheatrical reading of Plautus' Mercator.
Type: Lecture  -  Assessment: Written examination

肆种209  -  Cicero, Philippics
Instructor:
Konstantinos Spanoudakis
Description: Marcus Antonius, henchman of murdered Caesar, claims for himself the role of protagonist in the meta-Caesar era. Cicero turns against him with Demosthenic fierceness expecting to gain glory similar to the one from Catilina's conjuration. But this time his right hand badly miscalculated... The lectures will follow the text providing philological and historical commentary.
Type: Lecture  -  Assessment: Written examination

肆种333  -  Myth in Propertius
Instructor:
Michael Paschalis
Description: The seminar will examine the ways in which myth in Propertius functions in relation to the urban space and codified language of Roman elegy.
Type: Seminar  -  Assessment: Oral presentation and written paper


BYZANTINE AND MODERN GREEK PHILOLOGY


SUBDIVISION OF BYZANTINE PHILOLOGY

BY种115  -  Introduction to the Byzantine hymnography
Instructor:
Marina Detoraki
Description: An introduction to the terminology of the liturgical hymnography, to the hymnographical manuscripts and to their editions. The ancient hymns and the evolution of the hymnography : the kontakia of Romanos and the canons of Kosmas and John Damascene and others. A study upon selected texts.
Type: Lecture  -  Assessment: Written examination

抡种248  -  Byzantine poetry of the eleventh century
Instructor:
Ioannis Vassis
Description: Various changes can be observed in the mentality and society of the eleventh century. The aim of this lecture is to examine structure, basic features, political function and ideology of the secular and religious poetry of this century, with particular emphasis on the work of Christophoros Mytilenaios, Ioannes Mauropus and Michael Psellos.
Type: Lecture  -  Assessment: Written examination

抡种265  -  Handbooks of Military Theory
Instructor:
Emmanuel Patedakis
Description: ---
Type: Lecture  -  Assessment: Written examination

抡种319  -  The hagiographical novel
Instructor:
Marina Detoraki
Description: A research on selected hagiographical texts of low historicity, such as heroic Passions, adventurous monastic Lives and long edifying Tales, in order to find out possible techniques, motifs and relations with the Hellenistic novel as well as with other narrative kinds.
Type: Seminar  -  Assessment: Oral presentation and written paper

抡种337  -  The Work of Theodoros Metohites
Instructor:
Emmanuel Patedakis
Description: ---
Type: Seminar  -  Assessment: Oral presentation and written paper

SUBDIVISION OF MODERN GREEK PHILOLOGY

团种100  -  Introduction to Modern Greek philology and to the reading of literary texts
Instructor:
Alexis Politis (-), Stamatis N. Philippides (-)
Description: (St. N. Philippides) The goal of the lectures is twofold: to initiate new undergraduates, first, to the basic fields of Modern Greek philology as a discipline (bibliography, text editing, etc.), and, secondly, to the close reading of the literary texts. The second goal intends to make the students able to evaluate exactly the textual information (on both levels, the semantic chain and the additional meaning produced by the artistic form of the text) in their seeking, as readers, the total meaning of a literary text.
Type: Lecture  -  Assessment: Written examination

团种117  -  Digenis Akritis
Instructor:
Eirini Papadaki
Description: ---
Type: Lecture  -  Assessment: Written examination

团种157  -  1821-1831: Modern Greek Poetry in a Revolutionary period
Instructor:
Alexis Politis
Description: The aim of the course is to trace the radical changes which occurred to Modern Greek poetry during the war of Independence; changes concerning its form, ideological orientation, poetics, impact on European philhelenic circles. Most representative poets (Solomos, Kalvos) and general orientations will be examined. Finally, emphasis will be given to the fact that, after the foundation of the Greek Independent State all fresh and reviving ideas and movements, except that of the sentimental romanticism were debarred. The course will be based on analyses of pertinent texts which will be distributed.
Type: Lecture  -  Assessment: Written examination

团种185  -  The 'ethographic' realism in the work of G. Vizyinos, A. Papadiamantis and A. Karkavitsas
Instructor:
Dimitris Polychronakis
Description: The subject-matter of this class is the aesthetic ideology and practice of 'ethnographic' realism in the narratives of G. Vizyinos, A. Papadiamantis and A. Karkavitsas.
Type: Lecture  -  Assessment: Written examination

团种210  -  The Symbolism in the Poetry between the two Wars
Instructor:
Maria Athanasopoulou
Description: ---
Type: Lecture  -  Assessment: Written examination

团种244  -  Contemporary Prose: K. Tachtsis, A. Cotzias, A. Alexandrou
Instructor:
Christina Dounia
Description: ---
Type: Lecture  -  Assessment: Written examination

团种290  -  Helen of Troy in the 20th century
Instructor:
Angela Kastrinaki
Description: During this lecture we will examine versions of the mythical queen, as they have been elaborated by authors of the 20th century, in Greece and abroad. Lust and chastity, love per se, beauty-art, freedom, sexual emancipation, even loneliness, are some of the features that were ascribed to Helen during a century that was particularly inclined to a critical approach of the ancient myths.
Type: Lecture  -  Assessment: Written examination

团种302  -  Evidence for the Greek Typography
Instructor:
Eirini Papadaki
Description: ---
Type: Seminar  -  Assessment: Oral presentation and written paper

团种323  -  The Social outcasts in Modern Greek Literature
Instructor:
Christina Dounia
Description: ---
Type: Seminar  -  Assessment: Oral presentation and written paper

团种371  -  Reading Papadiamantis' The Murderess
Instructor:
Marina Aretaki
Description: The reception of Al. Papadiamantis' writings has been marked by various, and quite often contradictory, critical and ideological approaches and by the use of diverse methodological tools. This seminar proposes the study of The Murderess, one of Papadiamantis' most important writings, through as many hermeneutic attempts as possible and it aims to reveal both the complexity of the text and the polyphony of criticism as such.
Type: Seminar  -  Assessment: Oral presentation and written paper

团种379  -  The Question of Literature in the context of Greek linguistic controversy
Instructor:
Dimitris Polychronakis
Description: The subject-matter of this seminar is the Greek linguistic controversy from 18th till 20th century and its influence in the concept of literature.
Type: Seminar  -  Assessment: Oral presentation and written paper


LINGUISTICS


盟僦101  -  Introduction to history of Greek language
Instructor:
Dimitra Delli
Description: This introductory course surveys the main stages through which Greek has evolved as a member of the Indo-European family. The main changes in phonology, morphology, vocabulary, writing system, dialect diversification marking the transition from one stage to the next in the history of Greek will be presented and explained. The presentation will also be preceded by a brief account of the principles of comparative- historical methodology.
Type: Lecture  -  Assessment: Written examination.

盟僦148  -  Phonological Development
Instructor:
Ioanna Kappa
Description: This course provides an introduction to the problem of language acquisition from the phonological point of view, investigating aspects of the infant speech perception and vocal production through the acquisition of phonology. A range of theoretical models and approaches will be presented and discussed and four aspects of phonological development will be central to our account: the interaction of perception and production, the prosodic and segmental approaches, the cross-linguistic perspectives and the signifiance of individual differences.
Type: Lecture  -  Assessment: Written examination

盟僦165  -  SYNTAX I
Instructor:
Georgia Katsimali
Description: This is a general introduction which covers those notions that are fundamental to syntactic theory. The course treats basic constituent structure, basic argument structure and introduces the concept of syntactic dependencies. Technical machinery is explained in a way accessible to students with no previous training in formalisms. Comparison between traditional and theoretical syntax in the description of Modern Greek.
Type: Lecture  -  Assessment: Written examination

盟僦180  -  Introduction to Semantics and Philosophy of Language
Instructor:
Alexis Kalokerinos
Description: This course offers an initial, non-technical approach to the study of meaning as borne by language. The philosophical perspective inherent in such an approach will become apparent through study of the issues at hand. Students will be concerned with three thematic units, covering the following questions:
1. What is the semantic content of words and in what way do they relate to the world?
2. How are meanings composed when words meet up and are linked to form sentences?
3. How far is sentential meaning from what we want to say and what we understand when others talk to us?
Through discussion of these questions, standard topics in philosophy of language will be addressed, such as the issues of concept, meaning, reference and truth as understood within the framework of modern cognitive science.
Type: Lecture  -  Assessment: Written examination

盟僦181  -  Introduction to Logic and Formal Semantics
Instructor:
Alexis Kalokerinos
Description: This course follows on from the Introduction to Semantics and Philosophy of Language. No other specialist knowledge is required; we will begin with a revision of set theory. From there we will move on to an introduction to propositional logic, predicate logic, natural deduction theory and finally to intentional logic. At every stage we will discuss the applications of logic to semantics and pragmatics. Further attention will be devoted to the theory of quantifiers in natural language, definite descriptions and event semantics. The course concludes with a look at more specialist theories, such as Montague grammar, Situation Semantics and Discourse Representation Theory.
Type: Lecture  -  Assessment: Written examination

盟僦326  -  Lexicon-Syntax Interface
Instructor:
Georgia Katsimali
Description: Seminar on the Lexicon-Syntax interface. The mapping between argument structure and syntactic structure. Models of the relation between morphology and syntax (strong lexicalism, weak lexicalism, non-lexicalist architectures). The empirical phenomena that will be examined include verb alternations (passivization, reflexivization, causativization, anticausativization), derivational morphology (nominalizations, gerunds, participles) and compounding.
Type: Seminar  -  Assessment: Oral presentation and written paper

盟僦337  -  The Ancient Greek Vocabulary
Instructor:
Dimitra Delli
Description: This seminar deals with: 1. The ancient Greek vocabulary from 13th century BC (Linear B texts) up to the Hellenistic times, when Greek language altered to Hellenistic Koine spreads through the greatest part of eastern Mediterranean satisfying the contemporary communicative requirements of a constantly increasing Greek-speaking population. At the same time Hellenistic Koine gets in touch with other languages as Latin and Hebrew, which have an obvious influence on it. 2. The classical Greek vocabulary categorization (vocabulary inherited by Indo-European language, loan words and vocabulary created on the basis of classical Greek derivation and synthesis rules). 3. The ancient Greek dialects' vocabulary.
Type: Seminar  -  Assessment: Oral presentation and written paper


THEATRE-CINEMA STUDIES AND MUSICOLOGY


萅E280  -  Stage-Direction in Europe and Greece
Instructor:
Antonis Glytzouris
Description: Less than 150 years ago the stage-director was an unknown artist; nowadays he is considered as the chief artist of the theatre. This lecture provides an opportunity for the student to acquire an outline of the rise of the director from his shadowy origins in the middle of the 19th century up to his triumph in European and Modern Greek stage during the Inter-War years.
Type: Lecture  -  Assessment: Written examination

韧胖298  -  The French Comedy in Modern Greek Theatre
Instructor:
Eliza-Anna Delveroudi
Description: ---
Type: Lecture  -  Assessment: Written examination

市林157  -  Film History II
Instructor:
Panayiota Mini
Description: The course will cover the history of cinema from the end of WWII to the present. We will discuss the international film market after the war and the significant technological changes throughout the period. We will discuss major film directors and film movements (e.g. Italian neorealism and "new waves" or "new cinemas" in France, Germany, Russia, Japan, Brazil), as well as the recent developments in Asian cinema. We will also examine the developments in mainstream and independent American cinema. A film screening will follow each lecture.
Type: Lecture  -  Assessment: Written examination