DEPARTMENT OF PHILOLOGY

 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES - ACADEMIC YEAR 2006-2007

 

SPRING SEMESTER

 

DIVISION OF CLASSICAL STUDIES

 

 

Course title: Greek Reading and Prose Class: Part II

Name of lecturer: Α. Kavoulaki, E. Kornarou, N. Litinas, D. Spatharas

Course code: AEFF 020

Type of course:  Exercise 

Level of course: Introductory

Year of study: any   

Semester:  Spring

Number of credits: -

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences): The course aims a) at extending the students' knowledge of the morphology and syntax of the Ancient Greek language (Attic dialect), b) at improving their reading skills, and c) at developing their skill in Greek prose composition.

Prerequisites: none

Course contents:  The aims and format are the same as in Part I but this time the syntax of the complex sentence will be the primary object of study. More particularly, the syntactical topics to be covered are: 1. coordination and subordination; 2. subordinate clauses: a. object, b. purpose, c. causal, d. result, e. conditional, f. concessive, g. temporal, h. relative and comparative, i. clauses after verbs of fearing and precaution; 3. interrogative and exclamatory sentences; 4. direct and indirect speech; simple and complex sentences in indirect discourse. Apart from syntax, accentuation, etymology and aspects of historical grammar will also receive particular attention during the course. Practice in Greek prose composition will include larger and more complicated texts. As in Part I, four texts (different from those of Part I) will be prescribed for individual reading. An extract of about ten lines will be dictated during exams for correct spelling and translation. Other 'seen' texts and Exercises will also be included in the exam paper.

Recommended reading: D. A. Russell, An Anthology of Greek Prose, Oxford 1991;

L. R. PALMER, The Greek Language, London 1980.

E. SCHWYZER, Griechische Grammatik I-IV, München 1939-71 [I: Lautlehre, II: Syntax und syntaktische Stilistik (suppl. A. DEBRUNNER), III: Register, IV: Stellenregister].

H.W. SMYTH, Greek Grammar (revised by G.M. MESSING), Cambridge Mass. 1956.

Teaching methods: Exercises and lectures

Assessment methods:  Participation in class and written exams

Language of instruction: Greek

 

 

Course title: Hesiod: Theogony

Name of lecturer: Athena Kavoulaki

Course code: ΑEFF 103

Type of course: Lecture

Level of course: Intermediate/ Advanced

Year of study: 2/3/4

Semester: Spring

Number of credits: -

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

Familiarization of students with the language, structures and themes of the Hesiodic Theogony. Understanding of the wider cultural context of traditional epic poetry

Prerequisites: None

Course contents: This is a text-based subject. The primary aim is to read and discuss Hesiod’s Theogony from many different angles (language, style, compositional techniques etc.), as well as to highlight the wider context of Archaic epic poetry.

Recommended reading:

M. L. West, Hesiod: Theogony, Oxford 1966,

 J. Strauss Clay, Hesiod’s cosmos, 2003,

 R. Lamberton, Hσίοδος: ο Ποιητής και το Έργο του, Aθήνα 2005,

 N.Π. Mπεζαντάκος & X. Tσαγγάλης (επιμ.), Mουσάων αρχόμεθα: ο Hσίοδος και η αρχαϊκή επική ποίηση, Aθήνα 2006.

Teaching methods: Lecturing; questioning; discourse; audio-visual aids.

Assessment methods: Written examination

Language of instruction: Greek

 

 

Course title: Archaic Lyric Poetry (Selection)

Name of lecturer: Lucia Athanassaki

Course code: AEFF 122

Type of course: Lecture

Level of course: Intermediate

Year of study: all years

Semester: Spring

Number of credits: -

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

Familiarization with the archaic poetic idioms and with the cultural context in which they were produced.

Prerequisites: none.

Course contents:

Reading and interpretation of representative examples of the poetry of Alcman, Tyrtaeus, Archilochus, Alcaeus, Sappho, Stesichorus, Solon, Ibycus, Anacreon, Simonides, Pindar, and Bacchylides.

Recommended reading:

Maurice Bowra, Greek Lyric Poetry.

Teaching methods: Lecture and dialogue

Assessment methods: Written final exam

Language of instruction: Greek

 

 

Course title: Euripides, Troades

Name of lecturer: Eleni Kornarou

Course code: AEFF 152

Type of course: Lecture

Level of course:  Intermediate

Year of study: any

Semester:  Spring

Number of credits:  -

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

The main objectives of the course are the textual analysis of the play and its interpretation, with special emphasis on the historical, intellectual and political background of its era.

Prerequisites: Good knowledge of Ancient Greek Language

Course contents:

The course will start with a short introduction to Ancient Greek Tragedy and Euripides’ contribution to the development of the tragic genre. The discussion of Troades will focus on the text (language, metre), the main interpretative approaches to the play and the extent to which it mirrors the historical, intellectual and political background of its era.

Recommended reading:

Barlow, S.A., Euripides Trojan Women (εισ. – κείμ. – μτφ. – σχόλια), Warminster 1986.

Lee, K.H., Euripides Troades (εισ. – κείμ. – σχόλια),  London 1976.

Teaching methods: Class participation – dialogue

Assessment methods:  Written exam

Language of instruction: Greek

 

 

Course title: Herodotus

Name of lecturer: Z.A. Petraki

Course code: AEFF 186

Type of course: Lecture

Level of course: Intermediate

Year of study: any

Semester: Spring

Number of credits: -

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

Students will be able to: 1) form judgements about the distinctive/idiosyncratic characteristics of Herodotus’ narrative, 2) critically assess the numerous interpretative problems related to historical writing.   

Prerequisites: none

Course contents: The course will focus on a close reading of the first book of Herodotus’ Histories. We will investigate the book’s various interpretative problems (structure as well as the distinctive stylistic and linguistic features) but due attention will also be given to the intense controversies related to the work’s placement within the genre of history. The course will also examine the social and ideological contexts in which the work was produced assessing the influences that sealed Herodotus’ writing. 

Recommended reading:

Μαρωνίτης, Δ.Ν., Ηρόδοτος, Εισαγωγή – Μετάφραση – σχόλια, Πρόλογος Ι. Θ. Κακριδής, τομ. Ι, Αθήνα, 1964.

Μαρωνίτης, Δ.Ν., Ηρόδοτος, Επτά Νουβέλές και Τρία Ανέκδοτα, Εισαγωγή, Μετάφραση, και Τρία Δοκίμια, Αθήνα, 1981.

Μαρωνίτης, Δ.Ν., Ηρόδοτος, Οκτώ Νουβέλες και Τέσσερα Ανέκδοτα, Εισαγωγή, Μετάφραση, και Πέντε Δοκίμια, Αθήνα, 2001.

Άτσαλος, Β., Ηρόδοτος, Ιστορία του Ελληνικού Έθνους, τομ. Γ2, Αθήνα, 1972, 430-440.

Immerwahr, H.R., Ηρόδοτος, P.E. Easterling & B.M.W. Knox (eds.), Ιστορία της Αρχαίας Ελληνικής Λογοτεχνίας, μτφρ. Ν. Κονομής, Χρ. Γριμπά, Μ. Κονομή, Αθήνα 1990, 566-584, 604-605.

Powell, J.E., A Lexicon to Herodotus, Cambridge, 1938, rpt. Hildesheim 1966.

Jacoby, F., Herodotos, RE Suppl. 2 (1913) 205-520.

Allison, J.W., Conflict, Antithesis, and the Ancient Historian, Colombus, Ohio, 1990.

Boedeker, D. (guest, ed.), Herodotus and the Invention of History, Arethusa 20 (1987) 5-262.

Evans, J.A.S., Herodotus, Explorer of the Past. Three Essays. Princeton, 1991.

Fornara, C.W., The nature of History in Ancient Greece and Rome, Berkeley and London: University of California Press, 1983.

Lateiner, D., The Historical Method of Herodotus, Suppl. Phoenix Suppl. 23. Toronto 1989.

Moles, J.L., Truth and Untruth in Herodotus and Thucydides’, Gill, C., Wiseman T.P. (eds.), Lies and Fiction in the Ancient World, Austin: University of Texas Press, 1993.

Teaching methods: text-focused

Assessment methods: written examination

Language of instruction: Greek

 

 

Course title: Aiskhines, Against Timarchos

Name of lecturer: Dimos Spatharas

Course code:AEFF 267

Type of course: Lecture

Level of course:  Intermediate

Year of study: any

Semester:  Spring

Number of credits:  -

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

Make students familiar with Attic prose, examine methods of argumentation and relevant aspects of social history.

Prerequisites: The syllabus will be distributed in week 1-2.

Course contents: We shall examine matters of textual criticism and style, as well as the historical background of the speech, its rhetoric and relevant aspects of social history.

Recommended reading: The syllabus will be distributed in week 1-2.

Teaching methods: Lecture

Assessment methods: Written exams

Language of instruction: Greek

 

 

Course title: Lucian’s Dialogues

Name of lecturer: Eva Astyrakaki

Course code: AEFF 291

Type of course: Lecture 

Level of course: Intermediate

Year of study: any   

Semester: Spring

Number of credits: -   

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

The main objective of this course is to enable students to understand, through the polymorphy and the plethoric production of Lucian, the ways by which this author manages to criticize the morals, the institutions and the society of his era. The course will focus on selective dialogues which highlight Lucian’s satiric skills and his way of understanding his contemporary world.       

Prerequisites: intermediate level in grammar and syntax.

Course contents: Reading of Lucian’s selective dialogues.

Recommended reading:

J. Hall, Lucian’s Satire, New York: Arno Press 1981,

C.P. Jones, Culture and Society in Lucian, Cambridge, Mass./London: Harvard University Press, 1986,

D. Marsh, Lucian and the Latins, Ann Arbor: The University of Michigan Press, 1998.

Teaching methods: text-based approach, class participation and discussion 

Assessment methods: written examination

Language of instruction: Greek

 

 

Course title: Apollo on the Tragic Stage

Name of lecturer: Lucia Athanassaki

Course code: AEFF 313

Type of course: Seminar

Level of course: Advanced

Year of study: 3rd & 4th year

Semester: Spring

Number of credits: -

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

Thorough discussion of the various representations of Apollo in Greek tragedy, acquaintance with and critical assessment of major scholarly issues, development of argumentative skills and of the ability to formulate new questions.

Prerequisites: AEFF 100, AEFF 010 and AEFF 020.

Course contents:

Examination and assessment of the various representations of Pythian Apollo and the Delphic Oracle in the plays of Aeschlylus, Sophocles, and Euripides in light of their historical and political context.

Recommended reading:

W. Burkert, Greek Religion, ch. on Apollo and R. Bushnell, Prophesying Tragedy. Students will be guided individually with regard to the bibliography they need to use for their papers.

Teaching methods: dialogical

Assessment methods: Oral presentation and written essay

Language of instruction: Greek

 

 

Course title: Plato and Poetry

Name of lecturer: Z.A. Petraki

Course code: AEΦ 342

Type of course: Seminar

Level of course:  Advanced

Year of study: 3rd, 4th

Semester: Spring

Number of credits: -

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences): At the end of this course, students will be able to: 1) confidently approach Platonic texts and secondary literature for the purposes of research; 2) form judgements about the ‘birth’ of philosophic discourse and its relationship to poetry.

Prerequisites:?

Course contents: Plato’s views on poetry, and particularly those expressed in the Republic and the Ion, have had a major impact on the history of Western poetics and aesthetics. By way of text selection, the course will study the distinctive characteristics of Platonic philosophic discourse from the angle of its relationship to poetry. We will focus on the reasons than gave birth to the ‘ancient quarrel between philosophy and poetry’ (Republic 10), but due attention will also be given to the manner in which Platonic discourse incorporates certain poetic characteristics (language and style, themes and motifs) to serve philosophic and pedagogical needs.      

Recommended reading:

Annas, J., Εισαγωγή στην Πολιτεία του Πλάτωνα, μετφρ. Χ. Γραμμένου, Καλέντης, Αθήνα, 2006.

Brisson, L., Ο Πλάτων, οι λέξεις και οι μύθοι, μτφρ. Σ. Οικονόμου, Μεταίχμιο, 2003.

Ferrari, G.R.F., ‘Plato and Poetry’, στο G.A.Kennedy, εκδ., The Cambridge History of Literary Criticism, τομ. Ι, 92-148, Cambridge, 1989.

Gentili, B., Poetry and Its Public in Ancient Greece, μτφρ. A.T. Cole, Baltimore, ([1985]/1988).

Havelock, E.A., Preface to Plato, Harvard University Press, Cambridge Mass., 1963.

Murray, P., Plato on Poetry. Ion-Republic 376e-398b & 595-608b, Cambridge, 1996.

Nightingale, A.W., Genres in Dialogue: Plato and the Construct of Philosophy, Cambridge, 1999.

Szlezak, T., Πώς να διαβάζουμε τον Πλάτωνα, Θύραθεν-Επιλογή, Αθήνα, 1004.

Teaching methods: student-centered, oral presentation

Assessment methods:  Oral presentation, Essay

Language of instruction: Greek

 

 

Course title: Private documents from the Greek-Roman Egypt

Name of lecturer:  Nikos Litinas

Course code: AEFF 360

Type of course:  Seminar 

Level of course: Advanced

Year of study: 2/3/4+   

Semester:  Spring

Number of credits:-

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences): Each student will work on a certain kind of a private document (as described below)

Prerequisites: none  

Course contents: Private documents are texts written on papyri or ostraca and concern exclusively the activities of a person as an individual: contracts of marriage or divorce, contracts of apprenticeship, sales, leases, loans, testaments, private letters, invitations to marriage or dinner, receipts of payments, horoscopes etc. The texts that will be studied in the class come from Egypt and are dated in the Greek-Roman period. 

Recommended reading: E.G. Turner, Ελληνικοί Πάπυροι, Αθήνα 1981, MIET

Teaching methods: Introduction to Papyrology and Edition of a papyrus document (2 weeks/Nikos Litinas). Class presentation and exercises on reading of papyrus documents (11 weeks/students)

Assessment methods:  class presentation, participation in the class and submission of a term-paper at the end of the Semester

Language of instruction: Greek

 

 

Course title: Theophrastus, Characters

Name of lecturer:  Anastasios Nikolaidis

Course code: AEFF 370

Type of course: Seninar

Level of course:  Advanced

Year of study: 3/4

Semester:  Spring

Number of credits: -

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

Familiarization with the social reality of Athens towards the end of the 4th century B.C.; inquiry into the relationship of the Characters with other literary genres; Textual criticism           

Prerequisites: AEFF 100 and AEFF 010/020

Course contents: The Characters, on the one hand, will be studied as information-source for the social realities in Athens towards the end of the 4th century B.C. and, on the other, will be associated with the ethical philosophy of Aristotle. At the same time, the work will also be related to other literary texts and genres, notably to the Old and New Comedy. Finally, the rich and interesting manuscript tradition of the Characters will give us the opportunity to address various matters of textual criticism. Students will be assigned one or two characters each, which they will first present to the class in the context of the guidelines above, and then write an essay on them.

Recommended reading:

J. Diggle (2004), Theophrastus Characters, Cambridge (Introd./Text/ Transl./Commentary)

O. Navarre (1924), Caractères de Theophraste, Paris (Commentary)  

P. Steinmetz (1960/62), Theophrast: Charaktere, 2 τόμοι, München (Text/Transl./Commentary)

R. G. Ussher (1960), The Characters of Theophrastus, London (Introd./Text/Commentary)

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R. J. Lane Fox (1996), "Theophrastus' Characters and the Historian", PCPhS 42: 127-70.

J. W. Smeed (1985), The Theophrastan 'Character': The History of a Literary Genre, Oxford.

M. Stein (1992), Definition und Schilderung in Theophrasts Charakteren, Stuttgart.

P. Steinmetz (1959), “Der Zweck der Charaktere Theophrasts”, AUS 8: 209-46.

------------------------------------------------------ 

The relevant chapters in Lesky's and Easterling's –Knox's Histories of Greek Literature.

 

Teaching methods: Lecturing (two first lessons only)/Discussion combined with instruction and guidance.  

Assessment methods: Oral presentation and written essay

Language of instruction: Greek

 

 

Course title: Latin Reading and Prose Class II

Name of lecturer: Kostas Apostolakis, Eva Astyrakaki

Course code: LAFF 020

Type of course: Exercise 

Level of course: Introductory 

Year of study: any   

Semester/trimester: Spring

Number of credits: -   

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

The course aims a) at extending the students’ knowledge of the morphology and syntax of the Latin language, b) at improving their reading skills, and c) at developing their skill in Latin composition.     

Prerequisites: none  

Course contents: Subordinate clauses and indirect speech. Morphology and etymology. Differences between Latin and Greek syntax. Latin prose composition. Selected Latin prose and/or verse texts.

Recommended reading:

Θ. Κακριδής, Γραμματική της Λατινικής Γλώσσης, Αθήνα 1979.

Ι.Θ. Κακριδής, Το μεταφραστικό πρόβλημα, Αθήνα 1979.

Teaching methods: Exercises and lectures 

Assessment methods: Participation in class and written exams 

Language of instruction: Greek

 

 

Course title: A Survey of Latin Literature

Name of lecturer: Michael Paschalis

Course code: LAFF 100

Type of course: Lecture

Level of course: Intermediate

Year of study: Any

Semester/trimester: Spring

Number of credits: -

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences): Familiarization of students with the basic Latin genres, their Greek origins and their reception

Prerequisites: None

Course contents:  The course is an introductory survey of Latin Literature designed to familiarize students with the basic genres, their Greek origins and their reception. The reading and discussion of passages of ancient literary criticism constitutes an integral and vital part of the course.     

Recommended reading: Stephen Harrison (ed), A Companion to Latin Literature, Oxford: Blackwell 2005.

Teaching methods: Lecturing

Assessment methods: Written exam

Language of instruction: Greek

 

 

Course title: Terence, The Brothers (Adelphoe)

Name of lecturer:  Stelios Panayotakis

Course code: LAFF 150

Type of course:  Lecture 

Level of course: Intermediate 

Year of study: any   

Semester/trimester: Spring

Number of credits: -   

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

Critical discussion of Terence’s comedy; special emphasis will be given to character portrayal, the use of literary models, and dramatic technique. The evaluation of Terence’s work and ideology against both the cultural and the theatrical Greco-Roman background will receive particular attention.      

Prerequisites: none  

Course contents: Detailed analysis of style, metre and dramatic technique of extended excerpts from Terence’s comedy.

Recommended reading: 

S.M. Goldberg, Understanding Terence, Princeton 1986.

Α.S. Gratwick, Terence, The Brothers, Warminster, 2nd ed., 2000.

R.H. Martin, Terence, Adelphoe, Cambridge 1976.

Teaching methods: Class participation and discussion 

Assessment methods: Written 

Language of instruction: Greek

 

 

Course title: Cicero, De Oratore

Name of lecturer: Kostas Apostolakis

Course code: LAFF 200

Type of course:  Lecture 

Level of course:   Intermediate 

Year of study: any  

Semester/trimester:  Spring

Number of credits:   -

Objective of the course: To familiarize students with Cicero’s conception of the ideal orator, as a man who combines comprehensive knowledge with legal experience and rhetorical skills. Such an orator is able to play an important role both in society and in politics of his time.

Prerequisites:   none  

Course contents:   Reading and interpretation of selected chapters of De oratore, with emphasis both on the requisite background for the ideal orator and on activities pertinent to his art, i.e. invention, arrangement, style, memory and delivery. 

Recommended reading:

1. J.M.May/J.Wisse, Cicero, On the Ideal Orator: Oxford University Press, Oxford 2001;

2. E. Fantham, The Roman World of Cicero's De Oratore: Oxford University Press, Oxford 2004.

Teaching methods: class participation and discussion 

Assessment methods:  written 

Language of instruction: Greek

 

 

Course title: The ‘novella’ in Latin Literature

Name of lecturer: Stelios Panayotakis

Course code: LAFF 360

Type of course: Seminar 

Level of course: Advanced

Year of study: 3rd, 4th 

Semester/trimester: Spring

Number of credits:-

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

The course aims at a. the students’ acquaintance with the notion, the dramatic function, and the narrative use of the short story and the anecdote in Latin literature, with emphasis on the novel, and b. the illustration of the survival of the Latin ‘novella’ in modern European literature. 

Prerequisites: LAFF 100, LAFF 010 and 020

Course contents: Improved understanding of the terminology on ancient prose fiction including ‘Milesian Tales’ and ‘novella’. Analysis of the structure and contents of the inset tales in the novels by Petronius and Apuleius. Comparative study of the Latin ‘novella’ and short stories from modern literature (e.g. Boccacio, Decamerone).

Recommended reading: P.G. Walsh, Η Ρωμαϊκή Μυθιστορία, Αθήνα: ΜΙΕΤ 2000.

Semiotica della novella latina, Roma 1986.

L. Pepe, La novella dei Romani, Napoli 1991.

Teaching methods: Basic introduction given by the instructor and student’s participation and presentation of selected topics.

Assessment methods: class participation, οral presentation and submission of a written essay

Language of instruction: Greek

 

 

 

DIVISION OF BYZANTINE AND MODERN GREEK PHILOLOGY

 

 

Course titleReading of selected byzantine texts

Name of lecturer:  Ioannis Vassis

Course code: BYFF 010

Type of course: Exercise

Level of course: Ιntermediate

Year of study: 2/3

Semester/trimester: Spring

Number of credits:  -

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences): familiarization with the theory and practice of translating greek medieval texts

Prerequisites: none  

Course contents:

Goal of this course is to discuss, analyse and translate representative passages from texts of the byzantine literature that belong in various genres, taking into consideration the historical and social context that determined their level of style.

Recommended reading:  Ι. Θ. Κακριδής, Το μεταφραστικό πρόβλημα, Αθήνα 2000 (5)

Πρωτότυπο και μετάφραση. Πρακτικά συνεδρίου, Αθήνα 1980

G. Mounin, Οι ωραίες άπιστες, Αθήνα 2002

Teaching methods: lecturing 

Assessment methods:  written examination

Language of instruction: Greek

 

 

Course title: The hagiographical novel

Name of lecturer: Alexandra Zervoudaki

Course code: BYFF 142

Type of course: Lecture

Level of course: Intermediate

Year of study: any

Semester: Spring

Number of credits: -

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

To learn the basic characteristics, the patterns and the influences and have a practice on texts, in order to understand why they were written and get accustomed to their language, their style and the world they reflect.

Prerequisites: None

Course contents: A general survey on the gender, characterized of low historicity. (The typology: literary loci, narrative structure, techniques, characters of the heroes and persons. The literary ancestors and the formation of the genre:  the relations with the Hellenistic novel and other narrative kinds. Study upon selected passages of texts, e.g. the Pseudoclemens-Roman, Vita et Passio s. Eustathii, Vita ss. Xenophontis et socii, Vita et Conversatio ss. Martyrum Galactionis et Epistemes.  Barlaam and Ioasaph.

Recommended reading:

Clogan P., Medieval hagiography and romance, Cambridge 1975.

Delehaye Hipp., Les Légendes Hagiographiques, Subsidia Hagiographica 18, Bruxelles 1955. 

      - « -      Les passions des martyrs et les genres litteraires , Subsidia Hagiographica 13, Bruxelles 1966.

Kazhdan Al., A History of Byzantine Literature (680-850), Athens 1999.

Morgan J. R. & Stoneman R., Greek Fiction. The Greek Novel in Context, London 1994, 329-287.

Pouderon Bernard (ed.), Les personages du roman grec. Actes du colloque de Tours, 18-20 nov. 1999, Paris 2001, 269-371.

Teaching methods: lecturing/ practice on texts

Assessment methods:  Written examination

Language of instruction: Greek

 

 

Course title: The Byzantine “ekphrasis”

Name of lecturer: Marina Loukaki

Course code: BYFF 208

Type of course: Lecture

Level of course: Intermediate

Year of study: any

Semester: Spring

Number of credits:  -

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

Acquaintance with the specific literary genre and familiarization with the Byzantine rhetorical style.

Prerequisites: A good knowledge of ancient Greek.

Course contents: Study of theoretical texts which Byzantine authors follow in order to compose an ‘ekphrasis’, i.e. a literary description. Detailed analysis of descriptions of cities, art-works, and hunting scenes.

Recommended reading: Η. Ηunger, Βυζαντινή Λογοτεχνία, τ. Ι, κεφ. Ρητορική, ΜΙΕΤ, Αθήνα 20013

Teaching methods: Lecturing. Discussion in class of selected texts.

Assessment methods: Written examination

Language of instruction: Greek

 

 

Course title: Historicity and Myth: the historical background of Byzantine Hagiography

Name of lecturer: Alexandra Zervoudaki

Course code: BYFF 318

Type of course: Seminar

Level of course: Advanced

Year of study: 3rd, 4th

Semester:  Spring

Number of credits: -

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

The aim of the seminar is for the students to acquire a better knowledge on Hagiography and Historiography, explore their interaction and be able to understand the byzantine texts. Also learn how to produce their own papers.

Prerequisites: none

Course contents: The hagiographical texts are products of their time and consequently they reflect various aspects of life concerning the era during which they are written or to which they refer. Especially thehistoricalhagiographical texts, texts written almost immediately after the death of the saint by someone who knew him/her, are rich sources upon which we can base our knowledge of the history of that time. The aim of the seminar is to show, through a comparative survey of both hagiographical and historical texts, the relation between these two deferent genders and the interaction between them, especially the influence of the post-iconoclastic historiography on hagiography and the way hagiographical texts were written.

 

Recommended reading:

Delehaye Hipp., Les Légendes Hagiographiques, Subsidia Hagiographica 18, Bruxelles 1955. 

Heliadi Amalia, Οι βίοι των αγίων της βυζαντινής περιόδου ως ιστορικές πηγές: σημειώσεις και παρατηρήσεις για τα βυζαντινά αγιολογικά κείμενα της μέσης περιόδου 7ος – 10ος αι., Τρίκαλα 2006.

Hunger H., Die hochsprachliche profane Literatur der Byzantiner , v. II,

Gaiffier Baud., “Hagiographie et historiographie”, La storiografia altomedievale (=Settimane di studio del Centro italiano di Studi sull’ alto medioevo, 10-16 avril 1969, t. 17, 1970), 139-166, 179-196.

Halkin Fr., “L’ hagiographie Byzantine au service de l’ histoire”, Thirteenth International Congress of Byzantine Studies, Oxford 1966.

Kazhdan Al., A History of Byzantine Literature (680-850), Athens 1999.

Seiber Julia, The Urban Saint in Early Byzantine Social History, Oxford 1977.

Sevcenko Ihor., “Hagiography of the Iconoclastic Period”, Iconoclasm: Papers Given at the Ninth Spring Symposium of Byzantine Studies, Birmingham 1975, 1-42.

Teaching methods: lecturing and written assignments

Assessment methods:  oral presentation and written paper

Language of instruction: Greek

 

 

Course title: Greek Palaeography and Codicology

Name of lecturer: Ioannis Vassis

Course code: BYFF 364

Type of course: Seminar

Level of course: Advanced

Year of study: 3/4  

Semester/trimester: Spring

Number of credits:-

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

Ability to read Medieval manuscripts

Prerequisites: BYFF 100 and AEFF 010 or AEFF 020 

Course contents:

Introduction to the history of the greek script and of the medieval book types through exercises on the reading and transcribing of byzantine manuscripts. Introduction to the codicological terminology as well as to the preparation and the technique of an edition.

Recommended reading: 

E. Mioni, Εισαγωγή στην ελληνική παλαιογραφία, Αθήνα 1977

Γ. Κ. Παπάζογλου, Βυζαντινή βιβλιολογία, Κομοτηνή 2001

Teaching methods: written assignments 

Assessment methods:  oral presentation and written paper

Language of instruction: Greek

 

 

Course title: Introduction in Modern Greek Literature and in Reading Texts

Name of lecturer: Angela Kastrinaki

Course code: NEFF 100

Type of course: Lecture

Level of course: Introductory

Year of study: 1st

Semester: Spring

Number of credits: - 

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences): First steps in understanding and analyzing the literary text.

Prerequisites: none 

Course contents: What is literature and how can we differentiate it from other genres of discourse? What is its function in today’s world? Basic notions of literary theory.

Recommended reading:  Jonathan Culler, Literary Theory. A very short Introduction, 1997

Antoine Compagnon, Le Demon de la theorie, 1998

Teaching methods: lecturing 

Assessment methods: written examination

Language of instruction: Greek

 

 

Course title: An Introduction to (Modern Greek) Literature

Name of lecturer: Dimitris Polychronakis

Course code: NEFF 100

Type of course: Lecture

Level of course: Introductory

Year of study: 1st

Semester/trimester: Spring

Number of credits: -

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences): methodology; familiarity with literary texts; theory of Literature

Prerequisites: none

Course contents:  As an introduction it will be discussed what do the terms ‘Modern Greece’, ‘Modern Greek Literature’, ‘Modern Greek Civilization’ mean; what the continuity of Greece means and what problems it arises; the language question, etc. Then we will discuss what is Literature, the uses of Literature, how it reflects society, morphology, sociology of Literature, Criticism, etc. In every lecture one or several texts (mainly poems) will be analyzed

Recommended reading: Linos Politis, History of Modern Greek Literature, G. Veloudis, Grammatology. 

Teaching methods: lecturing

Assessment methods:  written examination

Language of instruction: Greek

 

 

Course title: The Sonnet in the Greek Poetry

Name of lecturer: Eirini Papadaki

Course code: NEFF 110

Type of course:  Lecture

Level of course: Intermediate

Year of study: any

Semester/trimester: Spring

Number of credits: -

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences): familiarization with the subject

Prerequisites: none

Course contents: Due to the secularization of the latent eroticism of the religious devotion and to the idealization of the erotic desire, a new codified discourse of erotic elegy was generated in the Italian peninsula during the 13th century. It is known as Petrarchism and is organized metrically in the form of the sonnet. The main features that assumed this major literary model in Europe will be examined, as well as its reception in the Greek poetry, from the very beginning with the Rhymes of Love written by the Cypriote poets of the 16th century to the sonnets written by Mavilis and Kariotakis.

Recommended reading: K. Mitsakis, The Greek Sonnet, Athens 1962 (in Greek)

Teaching methods: lecturing; some texts will be discussed

Assessment methods:  written examination

Language of instruction: Greek

 

 

Course title: Cretan Literature of the Golden Age

Name of lecturer: Stefanos Kaklamanis

Course code: NEFF 129

Type of course: Lecture

Level of course: Intermediate

Year of study: any

Semester/trimester: Spring

Number of credits: -

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences): methodology; familiarity with literary texts; theory of Literature

Prerequisites: none

Course contents: An account will be given of the main characteristics of the literary production in Crete during the last century of the Venetocracy, with detailed study of extracts from the works of the most eminent poets of this time (Chortatsis, Kornaros, Foscolos etc.)

Recommended reading: (ed. David Holton), Literature and society in Renaissance Crete; Linos Politis, Poetic Anthology (vol. iii, in Greek)

Teaching methods: lecturing

Assessment methods:  written examination

Language of instruction: Greek

 

 

Course title: Greek Popular Songs

Name of lecturer: Alexis Politis

Course code: NEFF 141

Type of course: Lecture

Level of course: Intermediate

Year of study: any

Semester: Spring

Number of credits: -

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

Familiarization with the topic

Prerequisites: none

Course contents: We will try to get a complete view from the side of social anthropology, history and literature, that is 1. The role of popular songs in the structure of an oral society, 2. Its contents (medieval war songs, ballads, brigand songs, etc.), and, 3. Morphology of the text that is, structure, techniques, etc. Particular emphasis will be given in the analysis of the poetics of ballads (songs that relate a story).

Recommended reading: G. M. Sifakis, Gia mia poiitiki tou ellinikou dimotikou tragoudiou, Herakleion 1988; Claude Fauriel, Ellinika dimotika tragoudia, Herakleion 1999.

Teaching methods: lecturing

Assessment methods:  written/oral  examination

Language of instruction: Greek

 

 

Course title: Poetry and Poetics of Andreas Kalvos

Name of lecturer:  Maria Athanasopoulou

Course code: NEFF 165

Type of course:  Lecture

Level of course: Intermediate

Year of study: any   

Semester: Spring

Number of credits:  -

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences): Familiarization with the work of a major representative of the poetry of the Ionian islands, with special reference to his language particularities, techniques of composition and relation to the ideology of romantic philhellenism.

Prerequisites: none 

Course contents: A general introduction to Kalvos's metrics, neoclassical techniques of composition vis-a- vis his romantic 'soul', and to his enlightenment/romantic background, will be followed by a discussion of a selection of his most important odes in class – through the method of 'close reading'. I envisage my introductory remarks taking up six meetings out of a total of thirteen, the individual close readings of selected odes the remaining seven meetings.

Recommended reading:  Filippo Maria Pontani (ed.). The Odes of Andreas Kalvos (1988), Evripidis Garandoudis, Polytropos Armonia (1995).

Teaching methods: lecturing. Some texts will be discussed in class

Assessment methods:  written/oral  examination

Language of instruction: Greek

 

 

Course title: The lyrical writers of the “1940’s generation”

Name of lecturer: Kelly Daskala

Course code: NEFF 248

Type of course: Lecture

Level of course: Intermediate

Year of study: any

Semester:  spring

Number of credits:  -

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

Familiarization with the object, the literary works, historical and aesthetic texts

Prerequisites: none

Course contents:

At the end of the German Occupation new writers, as Alkis Aggeloglou, Asteris Kovvatzis, Tasos Athanasiadis, Mona Mitropoulou, Kostas Stergiopoulos and others, make their literary debut. The “Generation of 1940” ”, as they call themselves, promise to renew prose turning to the literary genre of “lyrical prose”.

 

The lesson starts with a general introduction in the period of 1940-1950 and the crucial historical events of this decay. Then searching in the movement of Symbolism the beginning of prose’s attempt to be enriched by the differentia of lyrical poetry, we will describe its features (chase of the soul, subjective vision of the world, reaction to realism, allusiveness, mysticism), in order to look into the way the lyrical prose of 1940 responded to those. Are we, in short, facing up something “totally new” in Greek literature?  

 

Studying the literary works and the essays of the new generation, we will conclude, firstly, that the “Generation of 1940” represents a secondary literary group; it constitutes a stopover on the journey of Modern Greek literature. Secondarily, that –despite the attacks of the young writers on the Generation of 1930 and the alliance with the Generation of the 1920– their lyrical fiction is not a definite rupture, but it is a returning in narrative forms and themes with long tradition in the earlier Greek literature. 

 

However the genre of lyrical prose is defined anew by the contemporary history, the political and ideological new classifications of the crucial decade of 1940. The German Occupation, the end of the war, the Civil War affected the young artists, who describe their aesthetic choice as an act of “resistance” toward the reality and against those who forgot the tradition. The returning to the values of the Greek village and the praise of the folk are the main intentions of the Generation of War. The new element promised by the lyrical writers consists in a paradox; it is an attempt to compromise their low-voiced and pessimistic lyrical prose with the high-toned argument of the Greek character.

 

Studying finally the usual issues of their works (city/country, social matters, Christianity-resignation, pessimism, heavenly childhood), the use of the narrative forms that contribute in the poeticalness of prose (confession, music, rhythm, fable, dream), and the literary influences (Papadiamantis, Generation of 1920, symbolist prose, “northern literature”, Hamsun, Bunin, Korolenko), everything that establish the antithetical ideological core of the oeuvres of lyrical authors during the German Occupation and for a decade thereabout, we will see how they quitted and they have been consigned to oblivion.

 

Recommended reading:

α. Novels and short stories

Αγγελόγλου Άλκης, Εαρινό, διηγήματα, Εκδόσεις «Άλφα», [Αθήνα 1943].

Αμαρτωλοί, «Φιλολογικά Χρονικά» [Αθήνα 1944].

Κυπαρισσόμηλα, Ίκαρος [Αθήνα 1948].

Κάτω απ’ τον άδειο ουρανό, δράμα σε τρεις πράξεις, εφτά εικόνες, Ελληνική

Δημιουργία, Τ. Α΄, τχ. 8-12 (1.6-1.8.1948) σ. 541, 596, 667, 725, 787, Τ. Β΄,

τχ. 13-14 (15.8-1.9.1948), σ. 25, 94.

Ταχυδρόμος, Μαυρίδης, Αθήνα 21984 [11952].

Εγκόσμια, επιμέλεια εισαγωγή: Μιχάλης Μερακλής, Εκδ. Ζαχαρόπουλος, Αθήνα

1983.

Αγγέλου Ι., Ιστορίες των γαλάζιων ωρών, Αθήνα 1943.

Φαντασία, μυθιστόρημα Αθήνα 1949.

Αηδονόπουλος Γιάννης, Ο Έβδομος ουρανός, διηγήματα, Εκδ. Γ. Λουκάτος, Αθήνα 1943.

Αθανασιάδης Τάσος, Θαλασσινοί Προσκυνητές, Αετός, Αθήνα 1943.

Βενέζης Ηλίας, Αιολική Γη, Εστία, Αθήνα 91973 [11943].

Άνεμοι, διηγήματα, Άλφα, Αθήνα 1944.

Βουσβούνης Αντώνης, Προμήνυμα, Γαλαξίας Εκδόσεις Ερμείας, Αθήνα 31978

[Γλάρος, Αθήνα 11943].

Ο Άγιος Αντώνιος, θέμα για μυθιστόρημα, Ο Γλάρος, Αθήνα 1944.

Κοββατζής Αστέρης, Επεισόδια, Μαυρίδης, Αθήνα 1943.

Πρώτη Άνοιξη, Φιλολογικά Χρονικά [Αθήνα 1944].

Κάτω απ’ το γαλάζιο ουρανό, Φιλολογικά Χρονικά [Αθήνα 1946].

Χωριάτες, Μαυρίδης, Αθήνα 1951.

Μαντζουλίνου Αλέκα, Ο άνθρωπος με το βιολί, Αθήνα 1946.

Μητροπούλου Μόνα, Το σπίτι με τον κορυδαλλό, Πήγασος, Αθήνα 1944.

Απασιονάτα,  Οι φίλοι του βιβλίου, Αθήνα 1947.

Παναγιωτόπουλος Ι. Μ., Χειρόγραφα της μοναξιάς, Εκδόσεις των Φίλων, Αθήνα

31991 [11943].

Παπαγιωργίου Ναπολέων, Ο παράδοξος Γκόζλος και άλλα διηγήματα, Αθήνα 1943.

Πολιτάρχης Γ. Μ., Ο καθένας γράφει την ιστορία του κι άλλα διηγήματα, Αθήνα

[1943].

Όταν θα ’ρθει το καλοκαίρι, Λογοτεχνική γωνιά, Αθήνα 1948.

Στον απέραντο κόσμο, Λογοτεχνική γωνιά, Αθήνα 1949.

 

 

β. Essays and articles

Αγγελάτος Δημήτρης, Η φωνή της μνήμης: δοκίμιο για τα λογοτεχνικά είδη, Νέα

Σύνορα, Αθήνα 1997.

Άγρας Τέλλος, «Η συμβολιστική πεζογραφία και το Φθινόπωρο του Κ.

Χατζόπουλου», Νέα Εστία (1935) σ. 510-518, 566-574 [= Κριτικά, Τ. Α΄, επιμέλεια: Κ. Στεργιόπουλος, Ερμής, Αθήνα 1995, σ. 220-257].

 Αθανασιάδης Τάσος, Αποστασία (ο καλλιτέχνης ανάμεσα στο χτες και στο αύριο),

Ίκαρος, Αθήνα 1945.

Αργυρίου Αλέξανδρος, Ιστορία της ελληνικής λογοτεχνίας και η πρόσληψή της στους

δύστηνους καιρούς (1941-1944), Τ. Γ΄, Καστανιώτης, Αθήνα 2003.

Ιστορία της ελληνικής λογοτεχνίας και η πρόσληψή της στα χρόνια του

            ετεροκαθορισμένου εμφυλίου πολέμου (1945-1949), τόμος Δ΄, Καστανιώτης,

Αθήνα 2004.

Η Ελλάδα στη δεκαετία 1940-1950, Ένα έθνος σε κρίση, Θεμέλιο, Αθήνα 1984.

Η Ελλάδα ’36-’49, Από τη δικτατορία στον Εμφύλιο. Τομές και συνέχειες, επιμ.:

Χάγκεν Φλάισερ, Καστανιώτης, Αθήνα 22003.

Καστρινάκη Αγγέλα, Η λογοτεχνία στην ταραγμένη δεκαετία 1940-1950, Πόλις, Αθήνα 2005.

Κατσιγιάννη Άννα, Το πεζό ποίημα στη νεοελληνική γραμματεία: γενεαλογία,

διαμόρφωση και εξέλιξη του είδους (από τις αρχές ως το 1930), Διδακτορική

διατριβή-Φιλοσοφική σχολή Αριστοτελείου πανεπιστημίου Θεσσαλονίκης-Τμήμα Φιλολογίας, 2001.

Ματθιόπουλος Ευγένιος, Η Τέχνη Πτεροφυεί εν Οδύνη, Η πρόσληψη του

νεορομαντισμού στην Ελλάδα, Ποταμός, Αθήνα 2005.

Στεργιόπουλος Κώστας, «Η λυρική πεζογραφία του Άλκη Αγγελόγλου», Περιδιαβάζοντας Γ΄ Από τη μεσοπολεμική στη μεταπολεμική πεζογραφία, Κέδρος, Αθήνα 22002, σ. 127-147 [=«Άλκης Αγγελόγλου», Η Μεταπολεμική Πεζογραφία, Από τον πόλεμο του ’40 ως τη δικτατορία του ’67, Τ. Β΄, Σοκόλης, Αθήνα 1992, σ. 8-26].

– «Αστέρης Κοββατζής, Ο άλλος παράλληλος», Περιδιαβάζοντας Γ΄, ό.π., σ.148-169

[= «Αστέρης Κοββατζής»: Η Μεταπολεμική Πεζογραφία, Από τον πόλεμο του ’40 ως τη δικτατορία του ’67, Τ. Δ΄, Σοκόλης, Αθήνα 1992, σ. 104-121].

– «Συμβολισμός και σύμβολα στη μεταπολεμική πεζογραφία μας. Μερικά

αντιπροσωπευτικά δείγματα», Κ τχ. 5 (Ιούλιος 2004) [=Περιδιαβάζοντας Στ΄, «Από τα πρόσωπα στα σχήματα», Κέδρος Αθήνα 2004, σ. 99-119].

Φιλιππίδης Σ. Ν., Τόποι, Μελετήματα για τον αφηγηματικό λόγο επτά νεοελλήνων

πεζογράφων, Καστανιώτης, Αθήνα 1997.

Χάρης Πέτρος, Μακρινός Κόσμος, Εστία, Αθήνα 1944.

Κρίσιμη Ώρα, Σελίδες ρεμβασμού και περισυλλογής, Εστία, Αθήνα 1944.

Υπάρχουν «θεοί»;, Αετός, Αθήνα 1948.

Chadwick Charles, Συμβολισμός, μτφρ: Στέλλα Αλεξοπούλου, «Η Γλώσσα της

Κριτικής» (16), Ερμής, Αθήνα 1989 (11971).

France A., Moréas J., Bourde P., Τα πρώτα όπλα του συμβολισμού, μτφρ: Έκτορας

Πανταζής, Γνώση, Αθήνα 1983.

                                                                ***

Brown E. K., Rhythm in the novel, University of Nebraska Press, Lincoln Nebraska

1978.

Cohn Dorrit, Transparent Minds, Narrative Modes For Presenting Consciousness In

Fiction, Princeton University Press, Princeton New Jersey 1978 [Η μελέτη

κυκλοφορεί στα ελληνικά: Dorrit Cohn, Διαφανή πρόσωπα, αφηγηματικοί

τρόποι για την παρουσίαση της συνείδησης στη μυθοπλασία, μετάφραση-

επιμέλεια: Δήμητρα Γ. Μπεχλικούδη, Εκδόσεις Παπαζήση, Αθήνα 2001].

Freedman Ralph, The lyrical novel: Studies in Hermann Hesse, André Gide and

Virginia Woolf, Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey 1963.

Genette Gérard, Introduction à l’ architexte, Éditions du Seuil, Paris 1979 [Βλ. την

ελληνική μετάφραση: Gérard Genette, Εισαγωγή στο αρχικείμενο, μτφρ: Μήνα

Πατεράκη-Γαρέφη, Εστία, Αθήνα 2001].

Palimpsestes, Éditions du Seuil, Paris 1982.

Michaud Guy, Message poétique du Symbolisme, Librairie Nizet, Paris 1978 (11947).

Todorov Tzvetan, Les genres du discours, Éditions du Seuil, Paris 1978.

Vadé Yves, Le poème en prose, Belin, Paris 1996.

 

Teaching methods: Introductory lectures, presentation of bibliography and literary works

Assessment methods:  Written examination

Language of instruction: Greek

 

 

Course title: Illness and literature

Name of lecturer: Kelly Daskala

Course code: NEFF 304

Type of course: Seminar

Level of course: Advanced

Year of study: 3rd, 4th

Semester: Spring

Number of credits:-

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

Familiarization with the object, research, designing and working-out a seminar

Prerequisites: An Introduction to (Modern Greek) Literature; two (at least) Modern Greek courses

Course contents:

 

Divine punishment, fear, quarantine, social exclusion, taboo, and anecdote. The leprosy was for centuries (in many cases until our days) an illness with comprehensive metaphorical references. Susan Sontag says in Illness as metaphor that any disease that is treated as a mystery and acutely enough feared will be felt to be morally, if not literary, contagious. Leprosy represents probably the most typical case. In literature this “ancient illness” symbolizes the stigma of social exclusion. Although in the dawn of the 21st C. new diseases, like AIDS, took the reins. 

 

The seminar starts with a general introduction in the multi-sense references of leprosy in literature.  Then we are going to set the themes of the seminar. These cover a period that begins from Bible and the chapters of Leviticus, wherein we will search the creation of the myth related to the leprosy’s stigma. We are going to examine Greek and European literary production that covers different aesthetic movements and ideologies of important writers from the end of the 19th and the first half of the 20th C (Dimitrios Vikelas, Galateia Kazantzaki, Themos Cornaros, G. Ambot, André Gide, Leonid Andreiev, Emil Zola etc.) At the end we have papers that compares the texts above with those of the 21st C. (Victoria Hislop, Niki Troullinou, Nantin Gordimer).

 

Recommended reading

 

ESSAYS, STUDIES, ARTICLES

Μισέλ Φουκώ, Η ιστορία της τρέλας, μτφρ: Φρ. Αρμπατζοπούλου, Ηριδανός, Αθήνα 1975.

Σούζαν Σόνταγκ, Η νόσος ως μεταφορά, Ύψιλον, Αθήνα.

Μάνος Σαββάκης, Εγκλεισμός, στίγμα και βιογραφικές διαδρομές: ο θεσμός του λεπροκομείου της Σπιναλόγκας και η ασθένεια ως βιωμένη εμπειρία, Διδακτορική Διατριβή, Πανεπιστήμιο Κρήτης, Τμήμα Κοινωνιολογίας 2005.

Saul Nathaniel Brody, The Disease of the Soul: Leprosy in Medieval Literature, Ithaca, N.Y. and London: Cornell University Press 1974.

 

Ευγενία Κώτη, «Λωβοκομείο, Η ‘Σπιναλόγκα’ της Χίου», Η Αλήθεια (2.7.2007).

Jay F. Schamberg, «The Nature of the Leprosy of the Bible. From a Medical and Biblical Point of View», The Biblical World 13, no. 3 (Mar. 1899) 162-9.

Gilbert Lewis, «A Lesson from Leviticus: Leprosy», Man New Series 22, no. 4 (Dec. 1987) 593-612.

Zachary Gussow, George S. Tracy, «A Case Study in the Institutionalization of the Myth of Leprosy as ‘Leper’», American Anthropologist, New Series, 73, no. 3 (Jun. 1971) 695-709.

William F. May, «Institutions as Symbol of Death», Journal of the American Academy of Religion 44, no. 2 (Jun. 1976) 211-223.

Mary Douglas, «Witchcraft and Leprosy: Two Strategies of Exclusion», Man, New Series, 26, no. 4 (Dec. 1991), 723-236.

Marcia Gaudet, «Telling it Slant: Personal Narrative, Tall Tales, and the Reality of Leprosy», Western Folklore 49 (April 1990) 191-207.

 

AUTHORS AND WORKS

Δημήτριος Βικέλας, Άπαντα, Τόμος Β΄, φιλ. επιμ.: Άλκης Αγγέλου, Σύλλογος προς Διάδοσιν Ωφελίμων Βιβλίων, Αθήνα 1997.

Γαλάτεια Καζαντζάκη, Οι λεπροί ( Η άρρωστη πολιτεία), Θεσσαλονίκη 1981 [πρώτη δημοσίευση: Νέα Ζωή (Δ΄, Τ. ΙΧ, τχ. 2 Απρίλης-Ιούνης 1914].

Θέμος Κορνάρος, «Άπαντα 1»: Άγιον Όρος-Σπιναλόγκα, Εκδόσεις Χρόνος, Αθήνα 1982 (11933).

Γ. Άμποτ, Γη και νερό, Πόλις Αθήνα 2003 [Εκδόσεις Κασταλίας 11936].

Raoul Follerau, Ταξίδια στις χώρες των χανσενικών, Δαμασκός, Αθήνα 1957.

Wallace Lewis, Μπεν Χουρ, μτφρ:

Εμίλ Ζολά, Το αμάρτημα του αββά Μουρέ, μτφρ: Πέτρου Πικρού, Εκδόσεις Γκοβόστη [χ.χ.]

Λεωνίδα Αντρέγιεφ, Το σκοτάδι και άλλα διηγήματα, μτφρ: Αθηνά Σαραντίδου, Βιβλιοπωλείον Γεωργίου Ι. Βασιλείου, Αθήναι [χ.χ.]

Λεωνίδα Αντρέγιεφ, Ο Κλέπτης και άλλα διηγήματα, μτφρ: Σπ. Γερ. Φραγκόπουλου, Ελευθερουδάκης. Εν Αθήναις [χ.χ.]

Λεωνίδα Αντρέγιεφ, Η τρέλλα και άλλα διηγήματα, Εκδόσεις Ακροπόλεως, Αθήναι 1935.

Αντρέ Ζιντ, Τέλματα, εισ. Αλεξάνδρα Σαμουήλ, μτφρ: Γεωργία Ζακοπούλου, Δελφίνι, Αθήνα 1993.

Francois Mauriac, Το φιλί των λεπρών, Εκδόσεις Κονιδάρη, Αθήνα [χ.χ]

Β. Κάσνερ, Ο λεπρός, Νέα Πορεία, Αθήνα 1985.

Ναντίν Γκορντιμέρ, Ξύπνα, μτφρ: Τόνια Κοβαλενκο, Καστανιώτης, Αθήνα 2006.

Νίκη Τρουλλινού, «Καφενείο το Ρομάντζο:  περπατώντας στη Σπιναλόγκα…», στη συλλογή: Και φύσηξε νοτιάς…, Ροδακιό Αθήνα 2006.

Βικτώρια Χίσλοπ, Το νησί, μτφρ: Μιχάλης Δελέγκος, Διόπτρα, Αθήνα 2007.

 

Teaching methods: Introductory lectures, presentation of bibliography and papers from the students.

Assessment methods:  evaluation of students’ final papers

Language of instruction: Greek

 

 

Course title:  Stylistic Matters in late Byzantine and post-Byzantine Prose

Name of lecturer: Eirini Papadaki

Course code: NEFF 308

Type of course:  Seminar

Level of course: Advanced

Year of study: 3rd and 4th  

Semester/trimester: Spring

Number of credits:-

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences): familiarization with the Subject

Prerequisites: An Introduction to (Modern Greek) Literature; two (at least) Modern Greek courses

Course contents: An overall examination of the works in prose written from the last Byzantine period to the age of the Enlightenment will be undertaken, with emphasis laid on the specimens of narrative discourse. The aim of the seminar will be the exploration of the thematic drifts, the fictional elements, the stylistic techniques and the techniques of composition, that structure the aesthetics of the works of the period.

Recommended reading: Our Earlier Prose from the Beginnings to the First World War, vol. B1-2 15th century-1830, ed. G. Kechagioglou, Athens 1999 (in Greek)

Teaching methods: During the first lessons a general introduction by the teacher will be given; the students will get a special bibliography; each one will analyze a work of late Byzantine or post-Byzantine prose in terms of stylistic matters and write a paper on it

Assessment methods: oral presentation and written paper

Language of instruction: Greek

 

 

Course title:  Alexandros Papadiamantis

Name of lecturer:  Dimitris Polychronakis

Course code: NEFF 344

Type of course: Seminar

Level of course:  Advanced

Year of study: 3rd / 4th   

Semester/trimester: Spring

Number of credits:  -

Objectives Familiarization with the Subject

Prerequisites: An Introduction to (Modern Greek) Literature; two (at least) Modern Greek courses

Course contents:  The aim of the Seminar is the interpretative and stylistic examination of the narrative art of A. Papadiamantis in the wider context of Greek ‘’ethography’’

Recommended reading: N Triantaphilopoulos, Alexandros Papadiamantis, G. Farinou-Malamatari, Narrative Techniques of A. Papadiamantis, N Parisis, A. Papadiamantis. A Research of his narrative logic.

Teaching methods: : In the beginning a general introduction is given by the teacher; the students will receive narratives by Papadiamantis and try to interpret them in terms of form and content.

Assessment methods: oral presentation and written paper

Language of instruction: Greek

 

 

Course title: The Intellectual Hero: His Literary and Essayistic Representations in the early 20th c., in Greece.

Name of lecturer: Maria Athanasopoulou

Course code: NEFF 351

Type of course: Seminar

Level of course: Advanced

Year of study: 3rd and 4th

Semester/trimester:  Spring

Number of credits: -

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences): Familiarization with the research methods of New Historicism that involve reading history (and essay-writing) as literature, and prose-fiction as historical testimony.

Prerequisites: none 

Course contents: During the first meetings of this seminar course, the instructor will address such issues as: 1. The rise of the litterateur as public intellectual in early 20th c. Greece, with possible links of this phenomenon to the Dreyfus affair. 2. Recurring themes and ideological stances of the Greek intellectuals of the early 20th c. 3. A generation-based classification of Greek intellectuals; in what sense can the early 20th c. culture critics (such as Dragoumis and Vlastos) be differentiated from the intellectuals of the 1930s (such as Seferis and Theotokas)? 4. Major intellectual heroes as represented in key 20th c. European novels. 5. Major intellectual heroes as represented in key 20th c. Greek novels. 6. Assignment of written exercises. In the remaining seven meetings of this seminar course students will be expected to present their work on some aspect of the issues addressed by this seminar.

Recommended reading: Victor Brombert, The Intellectual Hero (1962), Helen Small (ed.), The Public Intellectual (2002).

Teaching methods: Lecturing as regards the general background to the topic of this seminar. Close readings of paradigmatic texts in class will be used as subsidiary materials. Concerning student essays, I envisage providing them with the relevant bibliography to a subject of their choice, and supervising their written work at several stages, during its preparation.

Assessment methods: oral presentation and written paper

Language of instruction: Greek

 

 

Course title: Literature and Periodicals, 1900-1940

Name of lecturer: Alexis Politis

Course code: NEFF 368

Type of course: Seminar

Level of course: Advanced

Year of study: 3rd and after

Semester:  Spring

Number of credits:

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

Understanding of the role of periodicals in the space of literature

Prerequisites: NEFF 100

Course contents: We will work with the periodicals of our Library. First we will examine bibliographies or other manuals on the subject which help our research or may be used as a pattern. Then we will devise the material according to the themes, the authors or the periodicals, and each student will select his own subject.

Recommended reading: Ch. L. Karaoglou, Periodika Logou kai Technis 1901-1940, I-III, Thessaloniki 1996-2007

Teaching methods: as above

Assessment methods: oral presentation and written paper

Language of instruction: Greek

 

 

Course title: Post-War Prose Fiction

Name of lecturer:  Olympia Tachopoulou

Course code: NEFF 379

Type of course: seminar

Level of course: Advanced

Year of study: any   

Semester/trimester: Spring

Number of credits: -

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences): understanding and appreciation of a range of prose fiction, text as a cultural form

Prerequisites: none 

Course contents: This seminar will focus on the theory and practice of prose writing in the post-war period. It will encourage students to situate literature within particular historical, biographical, critical and cultural contexts. We will discuss writers such as Tsirkas, Kotzias, Xatzis, etc.

Recommended reading: E. Stauropoulou, Proposals of reading prose fiction of an era, Sokolis, Athens 2001 (in Greek)

Teaching methods: In the beginning a general introduction is given by the teacher; the students will then receive textual material and a special bibliography: each one will present an article, and will select his own subject. They will present their subject and write a paper on it. 

Assessment methods:  oral presentation and written paper

Language of instruction: Greek

 

 

 

DIVISION OF LINGUISTICS

 

 

Course title: Introduction to the history of Greek language

Name of lecturer:  Dimitra Delli

Course code: GLOF 102

Type of course: Lecture 

Level of course: Introductory/ Intermediate

Year of study: 1/2   

Semester:  Spring

Number of credits:  -

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences): Familiarization with the history of Greek language

Prerequisites: none   

Course contents: This introductory course surveys the main stages through which greek has evolved as a member of the indo-european family. The main changes in phonology, morphology, vocabulary, writing system, dialect diversification marking the transition from one stage to the next in the history of greek will be presented and explained. The presentation will also be preceded by a brief account of the principles of comparative-historical methodology.

Recommended reading:

1.       Χριστιδησ Α.-Φ. (επιμ.). 2001. Ιστορία της Ελληνικής Γλώσσας. Από τις αρχές έως την ύστερη αρχαιότητα. Θεσσαλονίκη: Κέντρο Ελληνικής Γλώσσας. Ινστιτούτο Νεοελληνικών Σπουδών [Ιδρυμα Μανόλη Τριανταφυλλίδη].  

2.       ΜΠΑΜΠΙΝΩΤΗΣ Γ. 20025. Συνοπτική Ιστορία της Ελληνικής Γλώσσας με εισαγωγή στην ιστορικοσυγκριτική Γλωσσολογία. Αθήνα. 

Teaching methods: lecturing/written assignments     

Assessment methods:  written examination

Language of instruction: Greek

 

 

Course title: Phonology I

Name of lecturer:  Ioanna Kappa

Course code: GLOF 147

Type of course: Lecture

Level of course: Introductory

Year of study: 2/3/4

Semester: Spring

Number of credits: -

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences): Introduction to Phonology

Prerequisites: None

Course contents: This course provides an introduction to the basic concepts of Generative Phonology and central phonological issues will be discussed: universals, variation, markedness, distinctive features, syllabic structure, phonological rules, stress.

Recommended reading:

Nespor M. ( 1996) Φωνολογία. Αθήνα: Πατάκης

Teaching methods: lecturing with familiarization exercises

Assessment methods: Written examination

Language of instruction: Greek

 

 

Course title: Structure of Modern Greek Language

Name of lecturer:  G. Catsimali

Course code: GLOF 175

Type of course: Lecture

Level of course: Intermediate

Year of study: 3/4

Semester/trimester: Spring

Number of credits:  -

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

 

Prerequisites: GLOF 100

Course contents:

The course explores the notion of “grammar” vs. grammatical theory, the use of reference grammar, vs. pedagogical grammar and the different perspectives of grammatical analysis (descriptive, prescriptive, explanatory, etc.). By comparing different studies of Modern Greek grammar (Triadafyllides, Mackridge, Clairis-Babiniotis, Holton-Mackridge-Philippaki), we dwell in main characteristics of Modern Greek in terms of phonology, morphology, syntax and semantics.

Recommended reading:

Holton, D., P. Maqckridge & Ir. Philippaki-Warburton 1999: Ελληνικά: Συνοπτική Γραμματική της Ελληνικής Γλώσσας

Κλαίρης, Χρ. & Γ. Μπαμπινιώτης 1996: Γραμματική της Νέας Ελληνικής: Το Όνομα, Το ρήμα, Το επίρρημα

Mackridge, P. 1990: Η Νεοελληνική Γλώσσα

Teaching methods: lecturing

Assessment methods: written examination

Language of instruction: Greek

 

 

Course title: Introduction to Semantics and Philosophy of Language

Name of lecturer:  Alexis Kalokerinos

Course code: GLOF 180

Type of course: Lecture

Level of course: Intermediate

Year of study: all

Semester/trimester:  Spring

Number of credits:  -

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

See Course Contents

Prerequisites: none

Course contents:

This course offers an initial, non-technical approach to the study of meaning as borne by language. The philosophical perspective inherent in such an approach will become apparent through study of the issues at hand. Students will be concerned with three thematic units, covering the following questions:

1)   What is the semantic content of words and in what way do they relate to the world?

2)   How are meanings composed when words meet up and are linked to form sentences?

3)   How far is sentential meaning from what we want to say and what we understand when others talk to us?

Through discussion of these questions, standard topics in philosophy of language will be addressed, such as the issues of concept, meaning, reference and truth as understood within the framework of modern cognitive science.

Recommended reading:

  • Devitt, Michael & Kim Sterelny 1999. Language and Reality. An Introduction to the Philosophy of Language. Second Edition. Oxford: Blackwell
  • Portner,  Paul H. 2005. What is Meaning? Fundamentals of Formal Semantics. Oxford: Blackwell
  • Saeed, John I. 2003. Semantics. Second Edition. Oxford: Blackwell
  • Καλοκαιρινός Αλέξης 2000. Σημειώσεις Σημασιολογίας. Ρέθυμνο.

Teaching methods: lecturing

Assessment methods:  written examination

Language of instruction: Greek

 

 

Course title: Topics in Syntax

Name of lecturer: Elena Anagnostopoulou

Course code: GLOF 210

Type of course: Lecture

Level of course: Intermediate 

Year of study:

Semester: Spring

Number of credits: - 

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

An in depth examination of central issues in syntax

Prerequisites: Syntax I

Course contents:

In this class we will examine topics from the theory of syntax. We will focus in particular on theories of phrase structure, lexical and functional projections (clause structure and the syntax of DPs), movement phenomena (A and A´ movement) and Constraints on movement (theories of islands).

Recommended reading:

Fukui, Naoki. 2001. Phrase Structure. In Baltin, M., and C. Collins (eds.), The handbook of contemporary syntactic theory. Oxford: Blackwell.

 

Bobaljik, Jonathan and Susi Wurmbrand. 2006. Case in GB/Minimalism. http://bobaljik.uconn.edu/papers/CaseGBM.pdf.

[To appear in Oxford Handbook of Case.

 

Haegeman, Liliane. 1994. Case Theory. [from textbook Introduction to Government and Binding Theory.]

 

Marantz, Alec. 2000. Case and Licensing. In E. Reuland, ed. Arguments and Case: Explaining Burzio's Generalization. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.

 

Baltin, Mark. 2003. A-Movement In Mark Baltin and Chris Collins, eds. The Handbook of Contemporary Syntactic Theory. Oxford:Blackwell.

 

McCloskey, Jim. 1997. Subjecthood and subject positions. In Liliane Haegeman, ed. Elements of

Grammar. Dordrecht:Kluwer.

 

Pollock, Jean-Yves. 1989. Verb movement, Universal Grammar, and the structure of IP", Linguistic Inquiry 20, 365-424.

 

Bobaljik, Jonathan. 2001. Realizing Germanic Inflection: Why Morphology does not Drive Syntax. Journal of Comparative Germanic Linguistics 6: 129–167, 2002.

 

Chomsky, Noam. 1977. On Wh-Movement. In Formal Syntax. Culicover, Peter W., Thomas Wasow and Adrian Akmajian. eds. New York: Academic Press.

 

Riemsdijk, H. and E. Williams. 1986. Introduction to the Theory of Grammar. Cambridge MA: MIT Press.

 

Rizzi, Luigi. 1990. Relativized Minimality. Cambridge MA: MIT Press.

 

Mahajan, Anoop K. 1990. The A/A-bar Distinction and Theory. Unpublished Doctoral dissertation, MIT. [available MITWPL] [Chapters 1-2: pp. 7-106.]

Teaching methods: Lecture

Assessment methods:  written examination

Language of instruction: Greek

 

 

Course title: Attic Κoine and dorian Κoines

Name of lecturer:  Dimitra Delli

Course code: GLOF 304

Type of course: Seminar

Level of course:  Advanced

Year of study: 3/4

Semester: Spring

Number of credits: -

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences): Familiarization with the principle of Linguistic Change and the history of Greek dialectes.

Prerequisites: GLOF 100, GLOF 102

Course contents: In this seminar, we will examine the dorian koines languages witch appear, in the 3rd centary B.C. simultaneous with the constitution and the dominence of the political league among cities. They are characterized by the use of pandorian linguistic features and the influence of Koine Attic's elements: Northwestern, Peloponnesian and South-eastern Aegean Koine.

Recommended reading:

  1. Brixhe Cl. 2001. "De l'attique à la koiné". Mémoires de la Société de Linguistique de Paris. Νouvelle Série, t. XI. 29-46.
  2. La koiné grecque antique, I. Une langue introuvable? (sous la dir. de Claude Brixhe). Études anciennes 10, 1993. Nancy: Presses universitaires de Nancy.
  3. La koiné grecque antique, II. La concurrence. (sous la dir. de Claude Brixhe). Études anciennes  14,  1996.  A.D.R.A.- Nancy, De Boccard –Paris.
  4. La koiné grecque antique, III. Les contacts. (sous la dir. de Claude Brixhe). Études anciennes 17,  1998. A.D.R.A.-Nancy, De Boccard –Paris.
  5. LABOV W. 1994. Principle of Linguistic Change. Cambrige.   
  6. TEODORSSON S. T.1978. The Phonemic System of Attic in the Hellenistic Period. Göteborg-Lund: Studia Graeca et Latina Gothoburgensia XL. 

Teaching methods: lecturing / discussion / guidance

Assessment methods:  oral presentation and written paper

Language of instruction: Greek

 

 

Course title: Phonological Typology

Name of lecturer:  Ioanna Kappa

Course code: GLOF 340

Type of course: Seminar

Level of course: Advanced

Year of study: 3/4

Semester: Spring

Number of credits: -

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences): Familiarization with the typology of phonological systems.

Prerequisites: GLOF 100, GLOF 147 Phonology I (Introductory course to Phonology)

Course contents: This course will focus on the typology of phonological systems. The absolute and implication universals, variation and markedness will be disussed, as well as the phonological structures of geneticaly and non-geneticaly related languages. A tentative list of topics and readings (covering different languages and areas of phonology, such as features, syllable structure, stress etc. ) will be given, and will be supplemented according to the interests of the class. Students will be expected to lead discussion of a few papers during the course and to develop independent research projects.

Recommended reading:

Comrie, B. (1989), Language Universals and Linguistic Typology. Oxford: Blackwell.

Croft, W. A. (2002), Typology and Universals, . Cambridge: Cambridge University Press

Kenstowicz, M. (1994). Phonology in the Generative Grammar. Oxford: Blackwell.

Teaching methods: lecturing / discussion

Assessment methods: oral presentation and written paper

Language of instruction: Greek

Course title: Issues of Modern Greek Grammar

Name of lecturer:  G. Catsimali  

Course code:  GLOF 360

Type of course: Seminar

Level of course: Advanced

Year of study: 3/4

Semester/trimester: Spring

Number of credits: -

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

 

Prerequisites: none

Course contents:

The seminar gives the students the opportunity to study in depth specific areas of Modern Greek, such as the nature of subject, case and grammatical functions, nominal and sentential complements of verbs, functions of genitive and the phenomenon of ellipsis.

Recommended reading:

Teaching methods:

Assessment methods: The assessment consists of a term paper and its oral presentation.

Language of instruction: Greek

 

 

 

DIVISION OF THEATRE AND MUSIC STUDIES

 

 

Course title: Film History II

Name of lecturer:  Panayiota Mini

Course code: KPAF 102

Type of course: Lecture

Level of course:  Intermediate

Year of study: All

Semester:  Spring 2007/8

Number of credits:  -

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

Familiarization with the history of cinema from 1944 to the present.

Prerequisites: None

Course contents: The course will cover the history of cinema from the end of WWII to the present. We will discuss the international film market after the war and the significant technological changes throughout the period. We will discuss major film directors and film movements (e.g. Italian neorealism and "new waves" or "new cinemas" in France, Germany, Russia, Japan, Brazil), as well as the recent developments in Asian cinema. We will also examine the developments in mainstream and independent American cinema.

Recommended reading:

1. Kristin Thompson and David Bordwell, Film History: An Introduction (New York: McGraw-Hill, Inc.) 2002.

2. David A. Cook, A History of Narrative Film (New York: W.W. Norton & Company), 2004.

3. Jack Ellis, A History of Film (Englewood Cliffs, N. J.: Prentice Hall), 1990.

Teaching methods: Lecture, class discussion, film screenings

Assessment methods:  Written examination

Language of instruction: Greek

 

 

Course title: Theories of the Theatre: A Historical Survey

Name of lecturer: Antonis Glytzouris

Course code: THPAF 105

Type of course: Lecture

Level of course: Intermediate

Year of study: any

Semester: Spring

Number of credits: -

Theories of the theatre (theories about its nature, its means or its aims) emerged during the classical antiquity and since then were in step with the general evolutionary process of the art of the theatre. This lecture offers to the student a brief introduction to the major theoretical essays from the antiquity up to the Second World War (Renaissance, Baroque and Enlightenment eras, Romanticism, Realism and Symbolism, Avant-garde theatre).

Prerequisites: none

Course contents: The course will put emphasis on top European theoretical texts

Recommended reading: Marvin Carlson, Theories of the Theatre,  Cornell University Press, Ithaca, New York, ²1989 (¹1984), Barrett H. Clark & Henry Popkin (eds), European Theories of the Drama,  Crown Publishers, New York, 101978 (¹1965), Bernard F. Dukore (ed), Dramatic Theory and Criticism,  Holt, Rinehart & Winston, Florida, 1974.

Teaching methods: class participation and discussion

Assessment methods:  written exam

Language of instruction: Greek

 

 

Course title: History of Greek Cinema I: 1896-1960

Name of lecturer:  Elise-Anne Delveroudi

Course code: ΚELF 260

Type of course: Lecture

Level of course: Introductory

Year of study: any

Semester: Winter

Number of credits: -

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences): Familiarization with history and less known sides of this, both popular entertainment, and scientific field. Familiarization  with sources and bibliography. Familiarisation with film reading.

Prerequisites: none

Course contents: The coming of Cinema in Greece followed, more than any other type of entertainment, the way traced by the film production centres of Western Europe and the U.S.A. The greek case will be examined within this frame, from the first projections in Athens (1896) until the consequences of the coming of the talkies in the native production during the 1930’s. Rare films of the silent era will be viewed and discussed, within their historical context. 

Recommended reading:

Aglaia Mitropoulos, Découverte du cinéma grec, Παρίσι, Seghers 1968.

Michel Démopoulos (ed.),  Le cinéma grec, Παρίσι, Centre Georges Pompidou 1995.

Teaching methods: Lecture, film viewing, critical commentary, discussion

Assessment methods: Written examination

Language of instruction: Greek

 

 

Course title: The Shadow theatre in Greece

Name of lecturer: Manolis Seiragakis

Course code: THNEF 285

Type of course: Lecture

Level of course: Intermediate

Year of study: any

Semester: Spring

Number of credits: -

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

The origin of the genre and its life in the Asia. Its appearance in the Balkan peninsula during the Othoman Empire and its invasion in Athens in 1890’s. It’s development in Greece. Main players and changes.

Prerequisites: none

Course contents: The life of this specific theatre genre in Greece

Recommended reading: to be announced in week 1

Teaching methods: class participation and discussion

Assessment methods:  written exam

Language of instruction: Greek

 

 

Course title: Persons, figures, characters in the Greek Comedy (1900-1950)

Name of lecturer: Manolis Seiragakis

Course code: THNEF 320

Type of course: Seminar

Level of course: Advanced

Year of study: 3/4

Semester: Spring

Number of credits:-

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

An introduction to the numerous figures, types, characters, heroes of the modern Greek theatre, especially in the comedy.

Prerequisites: none

Course contents: Each student will carry out a research into the life of one specific figure among different theatre genres

Recommended reading: to be announced in week 1.

Teaching methods: class participation, oral presentation and discussion

Assessment methods:  written exam

Language of instruction: Greek

 

 

Course title: Sources in the History of Modern Greek Theatre

Name of lecturer: Antonis Glytzouris

Course code: THNEF 344

Type of course: Seminar

Level of course: Advanced

Year of study: any

Semester: Spring

Number of credits:-

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

The aim of this seminar is to familiarize students with the methods of historical research in the field of the Modern Greek theatre.

Prerequisites: none

Course contents: Students will carry out a research into the problems of specific primary sources (newspapers and magazines, memoirs and films), their location, criticism and interpretation, problems of bibliography etc.

Recommended reading: to be announced in week 1.

Teaching methods: lecturing / discussion

Assessment methods:  written exam, oral presentation and discussion

Language of instruction: Greek