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Literature

New from this Press:

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Spyros Sakkas (baritone), George Couroupos (piano), "Lingua Musicalis - greek poetry set to music"



     

Rethymnon Classical Studies

Rethymnon Classical Studies (RethClaS) publishes the proceedings of international colloquia and conferences held in Rethymnon (Crete) and organized and sponsored by the Department of Philology with funds provided by the University of Crete. The series editor is Michael Paschalis, Professor of Classics in the Department of Philology. The essays involve both Greek and Latin Literature. Volume 1, entitled Horace and Greek Lyric Poetry, contains papers presented at a conference by the same title that was held on May 10-11, 1999. Volume 2 contains the proceedings of Roman and Greek Imperial Epic, an event that took place on May 20-21, 2002. Volume 3, entitled Pastoral Palimpsests: Essays in the Reception of Theocritus and Virgil, contains papers presented at the conference The Successors of Theocritus and Virgil: The Reception of Bucolic Poetry in Ancient and Modern Times, which was held on May 22-23, 2006. Volume 4 will contain the papers of the Seneca colloquium of May 26, 2004, expanded with essays on Greek Drama. Starting with volume 2, RethClaS is published by Crete University Press. The proceedings of the international conferences on the ancient novel (RICAN) are published separately.




Volume 3, 2007

Pastoral Palimpsests:
Essays in the Reception
of Theocritus and Virgil

Crete University Press, Herakleion

ISBN: 978-960-524-237-4


The essays collected in Pastoral Palimpsests examine nine instances in the reception of Theocritus and Virgil. They cover a 2000-year time span and a variety of topics: the literary and metaliterary importance of rustic pride in the pseudo-Theocritean Idyll 20 (Marco Fantuzzi); the linguistic significance of a bucolic locus amoenus contained in the Life of Aesop (Richard Hunter); the position of the piscatory eclogues in Jacopo Sannazaro's poetic career (Thomas Hubbard); the imitation of the Virgilian career in John Milton's Epitaphium Damonis (Philip Hardie); William Wordsworth's complex and carefully concealed Virgilianism (Annabel Patterson); Thomas Hardy's remarkable debt to Virgil's Eclogues and the Aeneid (Michael Paschalis); responses to Virgil's Eclogue 1 in twentieth-century literature (Theodore Ziolkowski); the haunting presence of the Virgilian Eclogues in Michel Butor's Mobile (Fiona Cox); and the aesthetics of pastoral melancholy in Virgil, Miklós Radnóti, and Bob Dylan (Richard F. Thomas).



Price: Euro 25

Contents
Michael Paschalis, Introduction
Marco Fantuzzi, The Importance of Being boukolos: ps.-Theocr. 20 (pp. 13-38)
Richard Hunter, Isis and the Language of Aesop (pp. 39-58)
Thomas Hubbard, Exile from Arcadia: Sannazaro's Piscatory Eclogues (pp. 59-77)
Philip Hardie, Milton's Epitaphium Damonis and the Virgilian Career (pp. 79-100)
Annabel Patterson, Too much Virgil? Too much talk? Wordsworth's Anxiety of Influence (pp. 101-117)
Michael Paschalis, Thomas Hardy and Virgil (pp. 119-153)
Theodore Ziolkowski, Twentieth-century Variations on Eclogue 1 (pp. 155-169)
Fiona Cox, Night Falls on America: Virgilian Pastoral in Michel Butor's Mobile (pp. 171-189)
Richard F. Thomas, Shadows are Falling: Virgil, Radnóti, and Dylan, and the Aesthetics of Pastoral Melancholy (pp. 191-214)


A catalogue record for this book is available from the Library of the University of Crete

Pastoral Palimpsests:
Essays in the Reception of Theocritus and Virgil / edited with an Introduction by Michael Paschalis;
xiv, 216 p.; 24 cm. -(Rethymnon Classical Studies; vol. 3)
Includes bibliographical references and index.
ISBN 978-960-524-237-4 (pbk)
1.Virgil--Influence--Congresses.
2.Theocritus--Influence--Congresses
3.Pastoral poetry, Latin--Appreciation--Congresses
4.Pastoral poetry, Greek--Appreciation--Congresses
5.Literature, Comparative--Classical and European--Congresses
6.Literature, Comparative--European and Classical--Congresses
I.Paschalis, Michael.
ÉÉ.Series.

[PA6825.A3 P38 2007]

© Copyright 2007 Crete University Press - Michael Paschalis, Last updated: 28 February 2007





Volume 2, 2005 (2nd edition, 2007)

Roman and Greek Imperial Epic

Crete University Press, Herakleion

ISBN: 960-524-203-6


The papers collected in this volume were originally presented at an international conference sponsored by the Department of Philology of the University of Crete. They discuss issues in Pagan and Christian Imperial epic: Valerius Flaccus, Statius' Thebaid and Achilleid, Triphiodorus, Nonnus, Dracontius, and the Orphic Argonautica. They cover a variety of topics: the role of Juno as surrogate poet in Valerius' Argonautica (Meredith Monaghan), the unendurable excess of knowledge in the Thebaid (Ellen O'Gorman), the construction of masculinity in the Achilleid vis-à-vis Quintilian's Institutio oratoria (Alessandro Barchiesi), Juvenal's satire vs Imperial epic (Kirk Freudenburg), the relationship of Triphiodorus' Capture of Troy with Hesiod's myth of Pandora (Michael Paschalis), metapoetic aspects of the conflict between Typhoeus and Zeus in Nonnus' Dionysiaca (Philip Hardie), the biblical re-writing of Virgilian epic (Francesco Stella), generic consciousness in the Orphic Argonautica (Richard Hunter), and the complex relationship of the Orphic Argonautica with its Greek and Latin intertexts (Damien Nelis).



Price: Euro 25

Contents
Michael Paschalis, Introduction
Meredith English Monaghan, Juno and the Poet in Valerius' Argonautica (pp. 9-27)
Ellen O'Gorman, Beyond Recognition: Twin Narratives in Statius' Thebaid (pp. 29-45)
Alessandro Barchiesi, Masculinity in the 90's: The Education of Achilles in Statius and Quintilian (pp. 47-75)
Kirk Freudenburg, Making Epic Silver: The Alchemy of Imperial Satire (pp. 77-89)
Michael Paschalis, Pandora and the Wooden Horse: A Reading of Triphiodorus' Capture of Troy (pp. 91-115)
Philip Hardie, Nonnus' Typhon: The Musical Giant (pp. 117-130)
Fancesco Stella, Epic of the Biblical God: Intercultural Imitation and the Poetics of Alterity (pp. 131-147)
Richard Hunter, Generic Consciousness in the Orphic Argonautica? (pp. 149-168)
Damien P. Nelis, The Reading of Orpheus: The Orphic Argonautica and the Epic Tradition (pp. 170-192)


A catalogue record for this book is available from the Library of the University of Crete

Roman and Greek Imperial Epic / edited with an Introduction by Michael Paschalis;
xi, 195 p.; 24 cm. -(Rethymnon Classical Studies; vol. 2)
Includes bibliographical references and index.
ISBN 960-524-203-6 (pbk)
1. Epic poetry, Latin-Criticism and interpretation-Congresses.
2. Epic poetry, Greek-Criticism and interpretation-Congresses.
3. Literature, Comparative-Greek and Latin-Congresses.
4. Literature, Comparative-Latin and Greek-Congresses.
I. I.Paschalis, Michael.
ÉÉ.Series.

[PA6054.R6 2005]

© Copyright 2005 Crete University Press - Michael Paschalis, Last updated: 10 June 2005





Volume 1, 2002

Horace and Greek Lyric Poetry

ISBN: 960-7143-18-3

This volume offers a collection of papers originally presented at an international colloquium sponsored by the Department of Philology of the University of Crete. They discuss the relationship between Horace's Epodes, Odes, and Epistles, and the poetry of Archilochus, Hipponax, Alcaeus, Sappho, Anacreon, Pindar, Bacchylides, Simonides and Callimachus.
The essays cover a variety of topics: Horace's unwillingness to make comparisons between himself and the poets of archaic Greece (Denis Feeney), the conception of "lyric" in the absence of the lyre (Anastasia-Erasmia Peponi), the development of iambic verse from its origins to Horace's Epodes (Alessandro Barchiesi), the construction of lyric space (Michael Paschalis), and the social function of Horace's poetry vis-a-vis Greek performance poetry (Michèle Lowrie). They also offer detailed discussions of individual Horatian odes and their Greek lyric background (Lucia Athanassaki, Richard Martin, John Miller, Jenny Strauss Clay).



Price: Euro 25

Contents
Michael C. J. Putnam, Introduction (pp. 1-6)
Denis Feeney, The Odiousness of Comparisons: Horace on Literary History and the Limitations of Synkrisis (pp. 7-18)
Anastasia-Erasmia Peponi, Fantasizing Lyric: Horace, Epistles 1.19 (pp. 19-45)
Alessandro Barchiesi, Palingenre: Death, Rebirth and Horatian Iambos (pp. 47-69)
Michael Paschalis, Constructing Lyric Space: Horace and the Alcaean Song (pp. 71-84)
Lucia Athanassaki, On Horace, Odes 1.15 and Choral Lyric (pp. 85-101)
Richard Martin, Horace in Real Time: Odes 1.27 and its Congeners (pp. 103-118)
John F. Miller, Experiencing Intertextuality in Horace, Odes 3.4 (pp. 119-127)
Jenny Strauss Clay, Sweet Folly: Horace, Odes 4.12 and the Evocation of Virgil (pp. 129-140)
Michèle Lowrie, Beyond Performance Envy: Horace and the Modern in the Epistle to Augustus (pp. 141-171)


A catalogue record for this book is available from the Library of the University of Crete

Horace and Greek lyric poetry /
edited by Michael Paschalis;
introduction by Michael C. J. Putnam.
ix, 195 p.; 24 cm. --(Rethymnon Classical Studies; vol. 1)
Includes bibliographical references and index.
ISBN 960-714-318-3 (pbk)
1. Horace--Criticism and interpretation--Congresses.
2. Greek poetry--Influence--Congresses.
3. Literature, Comparative--Greek and Latin--Congresses.
4. Literature, Comparative--Latin and Greek--Congresses.
I. Paschalis, Michael.
PA6411 .H6 2002


© Copyright 2002 University of Crete - Department of Philology, Last updated: 01 August 2002